Craniometaphyseal dysplasia
Health dictionary
Untitled Document
Search :      

Art dictionary
Financial dictionary
Hollywood dictionary
Insurance dictionary
Literature dictionary
Real Estate dictionary
Tourism dictionary

 
  Craniometaphyseal dysplasia



Craniometaphyseal dysplasia

   An inherited skeletal condition that involves abnormal bone formation and abnormal mineralization of the skull as well as the long bones. There is increased density of craniofacial bones beginning at the base of the skull during early childhood. The progressive thickening of the bones of the skull can lead to severe visual and neurological impairment, such as facial palsy and deafness. Typical facial features include a wide bridge of the nose and wide spacing of the eyes. The growth plates (metaphyses) of long bones are widened (Erlenmeyer flask-shaped) and show decreased density while the shafts of the long bones are thickened.

RELATED TERMS
--------------------------------------

Condition
The term "condition" has a number of biomedical meanings including the following: 1.An unhealthy state, such as in "this is a progressive condition." 2.A state of fitness, such as "getting into condition." 3.Something that is essential to the occurrence of something else; essentially a "precondition." 4.As a verb: to cause a change in something so that a response that was previously associated with a certain stimulus becomes associated with another stimulus; to condition a person, as in behavioral conditioning.

Abnormal
Not normal. Deviating from the usual structure, position, condition, or behavior. In referring to a growth, abnormal may mean that it is cancerous or premalignant (likely to become cancer).

Bone
Bone refers either to a hardened connective tissue or to one of the individual structures, or organs, into which it is formed, found in many animals. Bones support body structures, protect internal organs, and (in conjunction with muscles) facilitate movement; are also involved with cell formation, calcium metabolism, and mineral storage. The bones of an animal are, collectively, known as the skeleton.

Skull
The bony framework of the head.

Density
The amount of darkness or light in an area of a scan reflects the compactness and density of tissue. Differences in tissue density are the basis for CT and MR scans.

Base
A chemical compound that either donates hydroxide ions or absorbs hydrogen ions when dissolved in water. Bases and acids are referred to as opposites because the effect of an acid is to increase the hydronium ion concentration in water, whereas bases reduce this concentration. Arrhenius bases are water-soluble and always have a pH greater than 7 in solution.

Childhood
1. The time for a boy or girl from birth until he or she is an adult. 2. The more circumscribed period of time from infancy to the onset of puberty.

Neurological
The medical science that deals with the nervous system and disorders affecting it.

Impairment
A defect in organ function or whole body system, which may be temporary or permanent (eg. hemiplegia).

Palsy
Paralysis of a muscle or group of muscles

Deafness
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears. Deafness may result from ear diseases; vestibulocochlear nerve diseases; or brain diseases.

Bridge
Stationary dental prosthesis (appliance) fixed to teeth adjacent to a space; replaces one or more missing teeth, cemented or bonded to supporting teeth or implants adjacent to the space.



SIMILAR TERMS
--------------------------------------

Cranial
The anatomical term for towards the head; also the general term for of the head. i.e. the lungs are cranial to the pelvis. See Caudal/Inferior/Superior

Cranial arteritis
A vasculitic disorder which presents with head pain and scalp tenderness and a high ESR. Sudden loss of vision may occur due to retinal artery occlusion. Part of the polymyalgia rheumatica disease spectrum. Also known as giant cell or temporal arteritis.

Cranial bone
Part of the top portion of the skull which protects the brain. The bones of the cranium include the frontal, parietal, occipital, temporal, sphenoid, and ethmoid bones.

Cranial cavity
The skull.

Cranial nerve I
The first nerve to emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium). (There are twelve cranial nerves.) The first cranial nerve is the olfactory nerve which permits the sense of smell.

Cranial nerve II
The second cranial is the optic nerve, the nerve that connects the eye to the brain and carries the impulses formed by the retina -- the nerve layer that lines the back of the eye, senses light and creates the impulses -- to the brain which interprets them as images.

Cranial nerve III
The third cranial nerve is the oculomotor nerve. The cranial nerves emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. There are twelve cranial nerves.

Cranial nerve IV
The fourth cranial nerve, the trochlear nerve, is the nerve supply to the superior oblique muscle of the eye, one of the muscles that moves the eye. Paralysis of the trochlear nerve results in rotation of the eyeball upward and outward (and, therefore, double vision).

Cranial nerve IX
The ninth cranial nerve is the glossopharyngeal nerve. The 12 cranial nerves, the glossopharyngeal nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.

Cranial Nerve Neoplasms, Malignant
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.

Cranial Nerve Palsies
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.

Cranial Nerve Palsy
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.

Cranial Nerve Tumors, Benign
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.

Cranial Nerve Tumors, Malignant
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.

Cranial nerve V
The fifth cranial nerve is the trigeminal nerve. The trigeminal nerve is quite complex. It functions both as the chief nerve of sensation for the face and the motor nerve controlling the muscles of mastication (chewing).

Cranial Nerve V
The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the trigeminal ganglion and project to the trigeminal nucleus of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.

Cranial Nerve V Diseases
Diseases of the trigeminal nerve or its nuclei, which are located in the pons and medulla. The nerve is composed of three divisions: ophthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular, which provide sensory innervation to structures of the face, sinuses, and portions of the cranial vault. The mandibular nerve also innervates muscles of mastication. Clinical features include loss of facial and intra-oral sensation and weakness of jaw closure. Common conditions affecting the nerve include brain stem ischemia, INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS, and TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA.

Cranial nerve VI
The sixth cranial nerve is the abducent nerve. It is a small motor nerve that has one task: to supply a muscle called the lateral rectus muscle that moves the eye outward.

Cranial Nerve VI
The 6th cranial nerve. The abducens nerve originates in the abducens nucleus of the pons and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the eye. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.

Cranial Nerve VI Diseases
Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.

Cranial Nerve VI Injury
Traumatic injury to the abducens, or sixth, cranial nerve. Injury to this nerve results in lateral rectus muscle weakness or paralysis. The nerve may be damaged by closed or penetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA or by facial trauma involving the orbit.

Cranial nerve VII
The cranial nerves emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. There are twelve cranial nerves. The facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve. The facial nerve supplies the muscles of facial expression.

Cranial Nerve VII
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and salivary glands, and convey afferent information for taste from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and for touch from the external ear.

Cranial Nerve VII Diseases
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.

Cranial Nerve VII Disorders
Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.

Cranial Nerve VII Injuries
Traumatic injuries to the facial nerve. This may result in FACIAL PARALYSIS, decreased lacrimation and salivation, and loss of taste sensation in the anterior tongue. The nerve may regenerate and reform its original pattern of innervation, or regenerate aberrantly, resulting in inappropriate lacrimation in response to gustatory stimuli (e.g., ""crocodile tears"") and other syndromes.

Cranial nerve VIII
The eighth cranial nerve is the vestibulocochlear nerve. The vestibulocochlear nerve is responsible for the sense of hearing and it is also pertinent to balance, to the body position sense.

Cranial Nerve VIII Diseases
Diseases of the vestibular and/or cochlear (acoustic) nerves, which join to form the vestibulocochlear nerve. VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and acoustic neuromas (NEUROMA, ACOUSTIC) are relatively common conditions that affect these nerves. Clinical manifestations vary with which nerve is primarily affected, and include hearing loss, vertigo, and tinnitus.

Cranial Nerve VIII Disorders
Diseases of the vestibular and/or cochlear (acoustic) nerves, which join to form the vestibulocochlear nerve. VESTIBULAR NEURITIS, cochlear neuritis, and acoustic neuromas (NEUROMA, ACOUSTIC) are relatively common conditions that affect these nerves. Clinical manifestations vary with which nerve is primarily affected, and include hearing loss, vertigo, and tinnitus.

Cranial Nerve VIIs
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and salivary glands, and convey afferent information for taste from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and for touch from the external ear.

Cranial Nerve VIs
The 6th cranial nerve. The abducens nerve originates in the abducens nucleus of the pons and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the eye. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.

Cranial nerve X
The tenth cranial nerve, and one of the most important, is the vagus nerve. All twelve of the cranial nerves, the vagus nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. The vagus nerve originates in the medulla oblongata, a part of the brain stem.

Cranial Nerve X
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).

Cranial Nerve X Diseases
Diseases of the tenth cranial nerve, including brain stem lesions involving its nuclei (solitary, ambiguus, and dorsal motor), nerve fascicles, and intracranial and extracranial course. Clinical manifestations may include dysphagia, vocal cord weakness, and alterations of parasympathetic tone in the thorax and abdomen.

Cranial nerve XI
The eleventh cranial nerve is the accessory nerve. The twelve cranial nerves, the accessory nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium) as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. The accessory is so-called because, although it arises in the brain, it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord.

Cranial Nerve XI
The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.

Cranial Nerve XI Diseases
Diseases of the eleventh cranial (spinal accessory) nerve. This nerve originates from motor neurons in the lower medulla (accessory portion of nerve) and upper spinal cord (spinal portion of nerve). The two components of the nerve join and exit the skull via the jugular foramen, innervating the sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles, which become weak or paralyzed if the nerve is injured. The nerve is commonly involved in MOTOR NEURON DISEASE, and may be injured by trauma to the posterior triangle of the neck.

Cranial nerve XII
The twelfth cranial nerve is the hypoglossal nerve. The twelve cranial nerves, the hypoglossal nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.

Cranial Nerve XII
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.

Cranial Nerve XII Diseases
Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.

Cranial Nerve XII Disorders
Diseases of the twelfth cranial (hypoglossal) nerve or nuclei. The nuclei and fascicles of the nerve are located in the medulla, and the nerve exits the skull via the hypoglossal foramen and innervates the muscles of the tongue. Lower brain stem diseases, including ischemia and MOTOR NEURON DISEASES may affect the nuclei or nerve fascicles. The nerve may also be injured by diseases of the posterior fossa or skull base. Clinical manifestations include unilateral weakness of tongue musculature and lingual dysarthria, with deviation of the tongue towards the side of weakness upon attempted protrusion.

Cranial Nerve XIIs
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.

Cranial Nerve, Eleventh
The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.

Cranial Nerve, Fifth
The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the trigeminal ganglion and project to the trigeminal nucleus of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.

Cranial Nerve, First
The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.

Cranial Nerve, Fourth
The 4th cranial nerve. The trochlear nerve carries the motor innervation of the superior oblique muscles of the eye.

Cranial Nerve, Ninth
The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and chemoreceptors of the carotid sinus.

Cranial Nerve, Second
The 2nd cranial nerve. The optic nerve conveys visual information from the retina to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the retinal ganglion cells which sort at the optic chiasm and continue via the optic tracts to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other important targets include the superior colliculi and the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the central nervous system.

Cranial Nerve, Seventh
The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and salivary glands, and convey afferent information for taste from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue and for touch from the external ear.

Cranial Nerve, Sixth
The 6th cranial nerve. The abducens nerve originates in the abducens nucleus of the pons and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the eye. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.

Cranial Nerve, Tenth
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).

Cranial Nerve, Twelfth
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.

Cranial nerves
"Nerves that emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. Cranial nerves come directly from the brain through the skull. There are 12 cranial nerves each of which is accorded a Roman numeral and a name: Cranial nerve I: The olfactory nerve; Cranial nerve II: the optic nerve; Cranial nerve III: the oculomotor nerve; Cranial nerve IV: the trochlear nerve; Cranial nerve V: the trigeminal nerve; Cranial nerve VI: the abducent nerve; Cranial nerve VII: the facial nerve; Cranial nerve VIII: the vestibulocochlear nerve; Cranial nerve IX: the glossopharyngeal nerve; Cranial nerve X:the vagus nerve; Cranial nerve XI: the accessory nerve, and Cranial nerve XII: the hypoglossal nerve. The cranial nerves are nerves of the brain."

Cranial Nerves
Twelve pairs of nerves that carry general afferent, visceral afferent, special afferent, somatic efferent, and autonomic efferent fibers.

Cranial Nerves, Eleventh
The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.

Cranial Nerves, Fifth
The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the trigeminal ganglion and project to the trigeminal nucleus of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.

Cranial Nerves, First
The 1st cranial nerve. The olfactory nerve conveys the sense of smell. It is formed by the axons of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS which project from the olfactory epithelium (in the nasal epithelium) to the OLFACTORY BULB.

Cranial Nerves, Fourth
The 4th cranial nerve. The trochlear nerve carries the motor innervation of the superior oblique muscles of the eye.

Cranial Nerves, Ninth
The 9th cranial nerve. The glossopharyngeal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve; it conveys somatic and autonomic efferents as well as general, special, and visceral afferents. Among the connections are motor fibers to the stylopharyngeus muscle, parasympathetic fibers to the parotid glands, general and taste afferents from the posterior third of the tongue, the nasopharynx, and the palate, and afferents from baroreceptors and chemoreceptors of the carotid sinus.

Cranial Nerves, Second
The 2nd cranial nerve. The optic nerve conveys visual information from the retina to the brain. The nerve carries the axons of the retinal ganglion cells which sort at the optic chiasm and continue via the optic tracts to the brain. The largest projection is to the lateral geniculate nuclei; other important targets include the superior colliculi and the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Though known as the second cranial nerve, it is considered part of the central nervous system.

Cranial Nerves, Sixth
The 6th cranial nerve. The abducens nerve originates in the abducens nucleus of the pons and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the eye. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.

Cranial Nerves, Tenth
The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).

Cranial Nerves, Third
The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.

Cranial Nerves, Twelfth
The 12th cranial nerve. The hypoglossal nerve originates in the hypoglossal nucleus of the medulla and supplies motor innervation to all of the muscles of the tongue except the palatoglossus (which is supplied by the vagus). This nerve also contains proprioceptive afferents from the tongue muscles.

Cranial Neuroma, Benign
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.

Cranial Neuromas, Benign
Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.

Cranial Neuropathies
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.

Cranial Neuropathies, Multiple
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.

Cranial Neuropathies, Traumatic
Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.

Cranial Neuropathy
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.

Cranial Neuropathy, Multiple
Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.

Cranial Neuropathy, Traumatic
Dysfunction of one or more cranial nerves causally related to a traumatic injury. Penetrating and nonpenetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; NECK INJURIES; and trauma to the facial region are conditions associated with cranial nerve injuries.

Cranial Pain
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Cranial Pains
Pain in the cranial region that may occur as an isolated and benign symptom or as a manifestation of a wide variety of conditions including SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM INFECTIONS; INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; and other disorders. In general, recurrent headaches that are not associated with a primary disease process are referred to as HEADACHE DISORDERS (e.g., MIGRAINE).

Cranial Pneumocyst
Presence of air or gas within the intracranial cavity (e.g., epidural space, subdural space, intracerebral, etc.) which may result from traumatic injuries, fistulous tract formation, erosions of the skull from NEOPLASMS or infection, NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES, and other conditions.

Cranial Pneumocysts
Presence of air or gas within the intracranial cavity (e.g., epidural space, subdural space, intracerebral, etc.) which may result from traumatic injuries, fistulous tract formation, erosions of the skull from NEOPLASMS or infection, NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES, and other conditions.

Cranial Sinus Thromboses
Thrombus formation in an intracranial venous sinus, including the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, and petrous sinuses. Etiologies include thrombosis due to infection, DEHYDRATION, coagulation disorders (see THROMBOPHILIA), and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.

Cranial Sinus Thrombosis
Thrombus formation in an intracranial venous sinus, including the superior sagittal, cavernous, lateral, and petrous sinuses. Etiologies include thrombosis due to infection, DEHYDRATION, coagulation disorders (see THROMBOPHILIA), and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.

Cranial Sinuse
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of the dura mater; they are devoid of valves.

Cranial Sinuses
Large endothelium-lined venous channels situated between the two layers of the dura mater; they are devoid of valves.

Cranial Suture
A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.

Cranial Sutures
A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.

Cranial Trauma, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Cranial Traumas, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Craniectomy
Surgery performed on the skull where pieces of bone are removed to gain access to the brain, and the bone pieces are not replaced.

Cranio
Referring to the cranium, the top portion of the skull, the bony vault that protects the brain. As in craniocleidodysostosis, craniology, craniopharyngioma, craniotomy, etc.

Craniocerebral Injuries
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Craniocerebral Injury
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Craniocerebral Trauma
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Craniocerebral Trauma, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Craniocerebral Traumas
Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.

Craniocerebral Traumas, Penetrating
Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.

Craniocervical Injuries
Traumatic injuries to the brain, cranial nerves, spinal cord, autonomic nervous system, or neuromuscular system, including iatrogenic injuries induced by surgical procedures.

Craniocervical Injury
Traumatic injuries to the brain, cranial nerves, spinal cord, autonomic nervous system, or neuromuscular system, including iatrogenic injuries induced by surgical procedures.

Craniocleidodysostosis
"A genetic (inherited) disorder of bone development characterized by:1. Typical cranial and facial abnormalities with square skull, late closure of the sutures of the skull, late closure of the fontanels (the soft spots), low nasal bridge, delayed eruption of the teeth, abnormal permanent teeth, etc. 2. Absent or incompletely formed collar bones (the ""cleido-"" part refers to the clavicles, the collar bones) The child with this disorder can bring its shoulders together or nearly so."

Craniofacial Abnormalities
Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.

Craniofacial Abnormality
Congenital structural deformities, malformations, or other abnormalities of the cranium and facial bones.

Craniofacial Dysostoses
An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by acrocephaly, exophthalmos, hypertelorism, strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, and hypoplastic maxilla with relative mandibular prognathism. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Craniofacial Dysostosis
An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by acrocephaly, exophthalmos, hypertelorism, strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, and hypoplastic maxilla with relative mandibular prognathism. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Craniofacial Pain
Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.

Craniofacial Pain Syndrome
Neuralgic syndromes and other conditions which feature chronic or recurrent FACIAL PAIN as the primary manifestation of disease. Disorders of the trigeminal and facial nerves are frequently associated with these conditions.

Craniofacial Pain Syndromes
Neuralgic syndromes and other conditions which feature chronic or recurrent FACIAL PAIN as the primary manifestation of disease. Disorders of the trigeminal and facial nerves are frequently associated with these conditions.

Craniology
The scientific study of variations in size, shape, and proportion of the cranium.

Craniomandibular Disease
Diseases or disorders of the muscles of the head and neck, with special reference to the masticatory muscles. The most notable examples are TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS and TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME.

Craniomandibular Diseases
Diseases or disorders of the muscles of the head and neck, with special reference to the masticatory muscles. The most notable examples are TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS and TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME.

Craniomandibular Disorder
Diseases or disorders of the muscles of the head and neck, with special reference to the masticatory muscles. The most notable examples are TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS and TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME.

Craniomandibular Disorders
Diseases or disorders of the muscles of the head and neck, with special reference to the masticatory muscles. The most notable examples are TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS and TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DYSFUNCTION SYNDROME.

Craniometry
The scientific measurement of the dimensions of the bones of the skull and face. It applies to measurement of the dead skull as opposed to CEPHALOMETRY, measurements performed on the living skull.

Craniopagus
Conjoined twins whose heads are fused together.

Craniopagus parasiticus
Conjoined twins joined at the head (craniopagus) in which a rudimentary head (with little or no body) is attached to the head of the larger and usually more normal twin. The rudimentary head was thought to be parasitic.

Craniopharyngioma
A type of benign brain tumor that emerges develops from embryonic tissue that forms part of the pituitary gland. Pressure on the pituitary by the tumor reduces the availability of the hormone vasopressin, raising the pressure within the cranium. A craniopharyngioma usually includes hard, calcified components within the tumor itself, and disrupts normal skull development in its vicinity. Treatment is usually via surgery.

Cranioplast
The methyl ester of methacrylic acid. It polymerizes easily to form POLYMETHYL METHACRYLATE. It is used as a bone cement.

Craniorachischises
Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)

Craniorachischisis
Congenital malformations of the central nervous system and adjacent structures related to defective neural tube closure during the first trimester of pregnancy generally occurring between days 18-29 of gestation. Ectodermal and mesodermal malformations (mainly involving the skull and vertebrae) may occur as a result of defects of neural tube closure. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, pp31-41)

Craniosacral Massage
Group of systematic and scientific manipulations of body tissues best performed with the hands for the purpose of affecting the nervous and muscular systems and the general circulation.

Cranioschises
Structural abnormalities of the central or peripheral nervous system resulting primarily from defects of embryogenesis.

Cranioschisis
Structural abnormalities of the central or peripheral nervous system resulting primarily from defects of embryogenesis.

Craniosynostoses
Premature closure of one or more sutures of the skull.

Craniosynostosis
Premature closing of joints or sutures in the skull.

Craniotomies
Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Craniotomy
A surgical opening of the skull.

Cranium
The skull, or bony structure of the head, that protects the brain.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Cranial nerve XI
The eleventh cranial nerve is the accessory nerve. The twelve cranial nerves, the accessory nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium) as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. The accessory is so-called because, although it arises in the brain, it receives an additional (accessory) root from the upper part of the spinal cord.

Cranial nerve XII
The twelfth cranial nerve is the hypoglossal nerve. The twelve cranial nerves, the hypoglossal nerve included, emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column.

Cranial nerves
"Nerves that emerge from or enter the skull (the cranium), as opposed to the spinal nerves which emerge from the vertebral column. Cranial nerves come directly from the brain through the skull. There are 12 cranial nerves each of which is accorded a Roman numeral and a name: Cranial nerve I: The olfactory nerve; Cranial nerve II: the optic nerve; Cranial nerve III: the oculomotor nerve; Cranial nerve IV: the trochlear nerve; Cranial nerve V: the trigeminal nerve; Cranial nerve VI: the abducent nerve; Cranial nerve VII: the facial nerve; Cranial nerve VIII: the vestibulocochlear nerve; Cranial nerve IX: the glossopharyngeal nerve; Cranial nerve X:the vagus nerve; Cranial nerve XI: the accessory nerve, and Cranial nerve XII: the hypoglossal nerve. The cranial nerves are nerves of the brain."

Cranio
Referring to the cranium, the top portion of the skull, the bony vault that protects the brain. As in craniocleidodysostosis, craniology, craniopharyngioma, craniotomy, etc.

Craniocleidodysostosis
"A genetic (inherited) disorder of bone development characterized by:1. Typical cranial and facial abnormalities with square skull, late closure of the sutures of the skull, late closure of the fontanels (the soft spots), low nasal bridge, delayed eruption of the teeth, abnormal permanent teeth, etc. 2. Absent or incompletely formed collar bones (the ""cleido-"" part refers to the clavicles, the collar bones) The child with this disorder can bring its shoulders together or nearly so."

Craniometaphyseal dysplasia

Craniopagus
Conjoined twins whose heads are fused together.

Craniopagus parasiticus
Conjoined twins joined at the head (craniopagus) in which a rudimentary head (with little or no body) is attached to the head of the larger and usually more normal twin. The rudimentary head was thought to be parasitic.

Craniopharyngioma
A type of benign brain tumor that emerges develops from embryonic tissue that forms part of the pituitary gland. Pressure on the pituitary by the tumor reduces the availability of the hormone vasopressin, raising the pressure within the cranium. A craniopharyngioma usually includes hard, calcified components within the tumor itself, and disrupts normal skull development in its vicinity. Treatment is usually via surgery.

Crapulence
Sickness or indisposition resulting from an excess of drinking (or eating). Crapulence is an almost exact synonym for a hangover.

Crapulent
Ill from excessive drinking or eating. Surcharged with liquor, or sick with intemperance.

   We thank you for using the Health Dictionary to search for Craniometaphyseal dysplasia. If you have a better definition for Craniometaphyseal dysplasia than the one presented here, please let us know by making use of the suggest a term option. This definition of Craniometaphyseal dysplasia may be disputed by other professionals. Our attempt is to provide easy definitions on Craniometaphyseal dysplasia and any other medical topic for the public at large.
 
This dictionary contains 59020 terms.      









  
                    © Health Dictionary 2005 - All rights reserved -

   craniometaphysealdysplasia / raniometaphyseal dysplasia / caniometaphyseal dysplasia / crniometaphyseal dysplasia / craiometaphyseal dysplasia / cranometaphyseal dysplasia / cranimetaphyseal dysplasia / cranioetaphyseal dysplasia / craniomtaphyseal dysplasia / craniomeaphyseal dysplasia / craniometphyseal dysplasia / craniometahyseal dysplasia / craniometapyseal dysplasia / craniometaphseal dysplasia / craniometaphyeal dysplasia / craniometaphysal dysplasia / craniometaphysel dysplasia / craniometaphysea dysplasia / craniometaphysealdysplasia / craniometaphyseal ysplasia / craniometaphyseal dsplasia / craniometaphyseal dyplasia / craniometaphyseal dyslasia / craniometaphyseal dyspasia / craniometaphyseal dysplsia / craniometaphyseal dysplaia / craniometaphyseal dysplasa / craniometaphyseal dysplasi / ccraniometaphyseal dysplasia / crraniometaphyseal dysplasia / craaniometaphyseal dysplasia / cranniometaphyseal dysplasia / craniiometaphyseal dysplasia / cranioometaphyseal dysplasia / craniommetaphyseal dysplasia / craniomeetaphyseal dysplasia / craniomettaphyseal dysplasia / craniometaaphyseal dysplasia / craniometapphyseal dysplasia / craniometaphhyseal dysplasia / craniometaphyyseal dysplasia / craniometaphysseal dysplasia / craniometaphyseeal dysplasia / craniometaphyseaal dysplasia / craniometaphyseall dysplasia / craniometaphyseal dysplasia / craniometaphyseal ddysplasia / craniometaphyseal dyysplasia / craniometaphyseal dyssplasia / craniometaphyseal dyspplasia / craniometaphyseal dyspllasia / craniometaphyseal dysplaasia / craniometaphyseal dysplassia / craniometaphyseal dysplasiia / craniometaphyseal dysplasiaa / xraniometaphyseal dysplasia / sraniometaphyseal dysplasia / draniometaphyseal dysplasia / franiometaphyseal dysplasia / vraniometaphyseal dysplasia / raniometaphyseal dysplasia / c4aniometaphyseal dysplasia / c5aniometaphyseal dysplasia / ctaniometaphyseal dysplasia / cganiometaphyseal dysplasia / cfaniometaphyseal dysplasia / cdaniometaphyseal dysplasia / ceaniometaphyseal dysplasia / c3aniometaphyseal dysplasia / crqniometaphyseal dysplasia / crwniometaphyseal dysplasia / crsniometaphyseal dysplasia / crxniometaphyseal dysplasia / crzniometaphyseal dysplasia / crabiometaphyseal dysplasia / crahiometaphyseal dysplasia / crajiometaphyseal dysplasia / cramiometaphyseal dysplasia / cra iometaphyseal dysplasia / cranometaphyseal dysplasia / crani9metaphyseal dysplasia / crani0metaphyseal dysplasia / cranipmetaphyseal dysplasia / cranilmetaphyseal dysplasia / cranikmetaphyseal dysplasia / craniimetaphyseal dysplasia / crani8metaphyseal dysplasia / cranionetaphyseal dysplasia / craniojetaphyseal dysplasia / cranioketaphyseal dysplasia / cranio,etaphyseal dysplasia / cranio etaphyseal dysplasia / craniom3taphyseal dysplasia / craniom4taphyseal dysplasia / craniomrtaphyseal dysplasia / craniomftaphyseal dysplasia / craniomdtaphyseal dysplasia / craniomstaphyseal dysplasia / craniomwtaphyseal dysplasia / craniome5aphyseal dysplasia / craniome6aphyseal dysplasia / craniomeyaphyseal dysplasia / craniomehaphyseal dysplasia / craniomegaphyseal dysplasia / craniomefaphyseal dysplasia / craniomeraphyseal dysplasia / craniome4aphyseal dysplasia / craniometqphyseal dysplasia / craniometwphyseal dysplasia / craniometsphyseal dysplasia / craniometxphyseal dysplasia / craniometzphyseal dysplasia / craniometa0hyseal dysplasia / craniometa-hyseal dysplasia / craniometa[hyseal dysplasia / craniometa;hyseal dysplasia / craniometalhyseal dysplasia / craniometaohyseal dysplasia / craniometa9hyseal dysplasia / craniometapyyseal dysplasia / craniometapuyseal dysplasia / craniometapjyseal dysplasia / craniometapnyseal dysplasia / craniometapbyseal dysplasia / craniometapgyseal dysplasia / craniometaptyseal dysplasia / craniometaph6seal dysplasia / craniometaph7seal dysplasia / craniometaphuseal dysplasia / craniometaphjseal dysplasia / craniometaphhseal dysplasia / craniometaphgseal dysplasia / craniometaphtseal dysplasia / craniometaph5seal dysplasia / craniometaphyweal dysplasia / craniometaphyeeal dysplasia / craniometaphydeal dysplasia / craniometaphyxeal dysplasia / craniometaphyzeal dysplasia / craniometaphyaeal dysplasia / craniometaphyqeal dysplasia / craniometaphys3al dysplasia / craniometaphys4al dysplasia / craniometaphysral dysplasia / craniometaphysfal dysplasia / craniometaphysdal dysplasia / craniometaphyssal dysplasia / craniometaphyswal dysplasia / craniometaphyseql dysplasia / craniometaphysewl dysplasia / craniometaphysesl dysplasia / craniometaphysexl dysplasia / craniometaphysezl dysplasia / craniometaphyseao dysplasia / craniometaphyseap dysplasia / craniometaphysea; dysplasia / craniometaphysea. dysplasia / craniometaphysea, dysplasia / craniometaphyseak dysplasia / craniometaphyseai dysplasia / craniometaphyseal eysplasia / craniometaphyseal rysplasia / craniometaphyseal fysplasia / craniometaphyseal vysplasia / craniometaphyseal cysplasia / craniometaphyseal xysplasia / craniometaphyseal sysplasia / craniometaphyseal wysplasia / craniometaphyseal d6splasia / craniometaphyseal d7splasia / craniometaphyseal dusplasia / craniometaphyseal djsplasia / craniometaphyseal dhsplasia / craniometaphyseal dgsplasia / craniometaphyseal dtsplasia / craniometaphyseal d5splasia / craniometaphyseal dywplasia / craniometaphyseal dyeplasia / craniometaphyseal dydplasia / craniometaphyseal dyxplasia / craniometaphyseal dyzplasia / craniometaphyseal dyaplasia / craniometaphyseal dyqplasia / craniometaphyseal dys0lasia / craniometaphyseal dys-lasia / craniometaphyseal dys[lasia / craniometaphyseal dys;lasia / craniometaphyseal dysllasia / craniometaphyseal dysolasia / craniometaphyseal dys9lasia / craniometaphyseal dyspoasia / craniometaphyseal dysppasia / craniometaphyseal dysp;asia / craniometaphyseal dysp.asia / craniometaphyseal dysp,asia / craniometaphyseal dyspkasia / craniometaphyseal dyspiasia / craniometaphyseal dysplqsia / craniometaphyseal dysplwsia / craniometaphyseal dysplssia / craniometaphyseal dysplxsia / craniometaphyseal dysplzsia / craniometaphyseal dysplawia / craniometaphyseal dysplaeia / craniometaphyseal dyspladia / craniometaphyseal dysplaxia / craniometaphyseal dysplazia / craniometaphyseal dysplaaia / craniometaphyseal dysplaqia / craniometaphyseal dysplasa / craniometaphyseal dysplasiq / craniometaphyseal dysplasiw / craniometaphyseal dysplasis / craniometaphyseal dysplasix / craniometaphyseal dysplasiz /