Measles
Health dictionary
Untitled Document
Search :      

Art dictionary
Financial dictionary
Hollywood dictionary
Insurance dictionary
Literature dictionary
Real Estate dictionary
Tourism dictionary

 
  Measles



Measles

    Childhood infectious disease causing rash and fever. A viral infection that may cause hearing loss. It does not always lead to hearing loss, but it can cause a wide range of sensorineural hearing loss from monaural to binaural and mild to profound in degree. Measles has historically been a common childhood disease with rare complications. Mass vaccination has resulted in a dramatic decline in measles incidence, but outbreaks now occur in older populations and in infants born to women whose immunity from vaccination has deteriorated. Periodic epidemics continue to occur. The vaccine is associated with serious adverse reactions including permanent nervous system damage and thrombocytopenia (a decrease in blood platelets responsible for blood clotting with accompanying spontaneous bleeding) all resulting from autoimmune disease triggered by the vaccine. Long-term effects are unknown.

RELATED TERMS
--------------------------------------

Childhood
1. The time for a boy or girl from birth until he or she is an adult. 2. The more circumscribed period of time from infancy to the onset of puberty.

Disease
Illness or sickness often characterized by typical patient problems (symptoms) and physical findings (signs). Disruption sequence: The events that occur when a fetus that is developing normally is subjected to a destructive agent such as the rubella (German measles) virus.

Rash
A reddish spot or patch of irritated skin. Rashes can be caused byillnesses, allergies, and heat and are usually temporary.

Fever
When body temperature rises above its normal level - defined as 98.6 degrees F, though it varies by individual and time of day. A fever is the sign of an immune system at work and usually indicates an infection.

Infection
Anything that invades the body and reproduces. Infections can be bacteria, protozoa, fungi, or viruses. Bacteria and fungi are one celled creatures that cause many infections including strep throat, bladder infections, and some lung infections. Fungi cause “athlete’s foot” and thrush, an infection in the mouth. Protozoa are small organisms with many cells that can cause infections in the guts or in the lungs. Most healthy people do not get protozoal infections, but people with suppressed immune systems can. Viruses are not really organisms; they are tiny particles that can live only inside another cell. They reproduce by taking over a cell and causing that cell to make more virus particles, rather than doing what the cell is supposed to do. Viruses cause most colds and flu cases.

Hearing
The sensation of sound.

Binaural
Relating to both ears.

Measles
Childhood infectious disease causing rash and fever. A viral infection that may cause hearing loss. It does not always lead to hearing loss, but it can cause a wide range of sensorineural hearing loss from monaural to binaural and mild to profound in degree. Measles has historically been a common childhood disease with rare complications. Mass vaccination has resulted in a dramatic decline in measles incidence, but outbreaks now occur in older populations and in infants born to women whose immunity from vaccination has deteriorated. Periodic epidemics continue to occur. The vaccine is associated with serious adverse reactions including permanent nervous system damage and thrombocytopenia (a decrease in blood platelets responsible for blood clotting with accompanying spontaneous bleeding) all resulting from autoimmune disease triggered by the vaccine. Long-term effects are unknown.

Vaccination
Originally referred to immunization against smallpox with the less virulent cowpox (vaccinia) virus; more loosely used for any immunization against a pathogen.

Incidence
Statistic that equals the number of new cases of a particular disease that occur in a population during a defined period of time, usually one year.

Infants
A child between 1 and 23 months of age.

Immunity
When a body's immune system helps fend off disease.

Epidemics
Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes epidemics.

Vaccine
A preparation, often of living weakened microorganisms, that is introduced into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease by causing the formation of antibodies.

Thrombocytopenia
Decrease in blood platelets.

Blood
The life-maintaining fluid which is made up of plasma, red blood cells (erythrocytes), white blood cells (leukocytes), and platelets; blood circulates through the body's heart, arteries, veins, and capillaries; it carries away waste matter and carbon dioxide, and brings nourishment, electrolytes, hormones, vitamins, antibodies, heat, and oxygen to the tissues.

Platelets
Cells found in the blood.

Clotting
The sealing of a blood vessel with coagulated blood.

Autoimmune
Pertaining to autoimmunity, a misdirected immune response that occurs when the immune system goes awry and attacks the body itself. Autoimmunity is present to some extent in everyone and is usually harmless. However, autoimmunity can cause a broad range of human illnesses, known collectively as autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases occur when there is progression from benign autoimmunity to pathogenic autoimmunity. This progression is determined by genetic influences as well as environmental triggers. Autoimmunity is evidenced by the presence of autoantibodies (antibodies directed against the person who produced them) and T cells that are reactive with host antigens.



SIMILAR TERMS
--------------------------------------

Measles mumps rubella vaccine
Used to prevent measles, mumps, and rubella, the MMR vaccine is usually given first between 12 and 15 months, and then again later in childhood. Reactions to the MMR vaccine are common, but generally mild: 20 percent of children will develop a rash or slight fever one to two weeks after receiving the shot.

Measurin
Measurin is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): aspirin.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Mucus
A substance secreted by various tissues in the body (the mucous membranes) made up of water, mucin (a glycoprotein), salts, and some cells. In the lungs, mucus serves to lubricate the insides of the airways and to trap inhaled foreign particles so that they can be coughed out. In asthma, however, an excess of mucus is produced and can actually block airways. Mucus also tends to be thicker and more viscous in asthmatics.

Membrane
A flexible layer surrounding a cell, organelle (such as the nucleus), or other bodily structure. The movement of molecules across a membrane is strictly regulated in both directions.

Mesothelioma
Malignant spreading tumour of the mesothelium of the pleura, pericardium, or peritoneum, arising as a result of the presence of asbestos fibres. It is diagnostic of exposure to asbestos.

Mesothelium
Tissue formed by specialized cells lining the chest, abdominal cavities, and the outer surface of most internal organs. Mesothelium helps protect the organs by producing a lubricating fluid that allows the organs to move.

Measles

Microorganism
An organism that can be seen only under a microscope. Categories of microorganisms include Algae, Bacteria, Fungi, Protozoa, Viruses, or Subviral Agents. Also referred to as microbe.

Microbe
Microscopic organism, especially one that transmits a disease.

Melanoma
The most dangerous of all skin cancers, melanoma is characterized by the uncontrolled growth of pigment-producing tanning cells (melanocytes). If detected in the early stages, melanoma can often be treated successfully, but in the later stages it spreads to other organs and can result in death.

Monoploid
A cell having only one chromosome set (usually as an aberration) or an organism composed of such cells.

Molecular
Refers to the basic building blocks of the genetic material, such as DNA, genes and the other chemicals involved with the functioning of genes.

   We thank you for using the Health Dictionary to search for Measles. If you have a better definition for Measles than the one presented here, please let us know by making use of the suggest a term option. This definition of Measles may be disputed by other professionals. Our attempt is to provide easy definitions on Measles and any other medical topic for the public at large.
 
This dictionary contains 59020 terms.      









  
                    © Health Dictionary 2005 - All rights reserved -

   easles / masles / mesles / meales / meases / measls / measle / mmeasles / meeasles / meaasles / meassles / measlles / measlees / measless / neasles / jeasles / keasles / ,easles / easles / m3asles / m4asles / mrasles / mfasles / mdasles / msasles / mwasles / meqsles / mewsles / messles / mexsles / mezsles / meawles / meaeles / meadles / meaxles / meazles / meaales / meaqles / measoes / measpes / meas;es / meas.es / meas,es / measkes / measies / measl3s / measl4s / measlrs / measlfs / measlds / measlss / measlws / measlew / measlee / measled / measlex / measlez / measlea / measleq /