Gland
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  Gland



Gland

   An organ that releases a chemical. Endocrine glands are ductless and secrete hormones directly into the bloodstream. Exocrine glands secrete externally, either through a tube or duct.

RELATED TERMS
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Organ
A structural unit of an animal or plant that serves a specific function.

Endocrine
Pertaining to hormones and the glands that make and secrete them into the bloodstream through which they travel to affect distant organs. The endocrine sites include the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, pineal gland, thyroid, parathyroids, heart (which makes atrial-natriuretic peptide), the stomach and intestines, islets of Langerhans in the pancreas, the adrenal glands, the kidney (which makes renin, erythropoietin, and calcitriol), fat cells (which make leptin). the testes, the ovarian follicle (estrogens) and the corpus luteum in the ovary). Endocrine is as opposed to exocrine. (The exocrine glands include the salivary glands, sweat glands and glands within the gastrointestinal tract.)

Secrete
To make and give off such as when the beta cells make insulin and then release it into the blood so that the other cells in the body can use it to turn glucose (sugar) into energy.

Hormones
Biological compounds that communicate information at a distance. Hormones require specific receptors to begin their biological action and use second messengers to initiate the cellular process that uses that information.

Exocrine
Pertaining to a gland with a duct through which its secretion, for example, tears or saliva, passes.

Duct
A channel or passage through which fluids move.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Gland Calculi, Salivary
Calculi occurring in a salivary gland. Most salivary gland calculi occur in the submandibular gland, but can also occur in the parotid gland and in the sublingual and minor salivary glands.

Gland Calculus, Salivary
Calculi occurring in a salivary gland. Most salivary gland calculi occur in the submandibular gland, but can also occur in the parotid gland and in the sublingual and minor salivary glands.

Gland Disease, Sebaceous
Diseases of the sebaceous glands such as sebaceous hyperplasia and sebaceous cell carcinoma (SEBACEOUS GLAND NEOPLASMS).

Gland Diseases, Sebaceous
Diseases of the sebaceous glands such as sebaceous hyperplasia and sebaceous cell carcinoma (SEBACEOUS GLAND NEOPLASMS).

Gland Fistula, Salivary
A fistula between a salivary duct or gland and the cutaneous surface of the oral cavity.

Gland Fistulas, Salivary
A fistula between a salivary duct or gland and the cutaneous surface of the oral cavity.

Gland Neoplasm, Salivary
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.

Gland Neoplasm, Sublingual
Neoplasms of the sublingual glands.

Gland Neoplasms, Salivary
Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.

Gland Neoplasms, Sublingual
Neoplasms of the sublingual glands.

Gland Stone, Salivary
Calculi occurring in a salivary gland. Most salivary gland calculi occur in the submandibular gland, but can also occur in the parotid gland and in the sublingual and minor salivary glands.

Gland Stones, Salivary
Calculi occurring in a salivary gland. Most salivary gland calculi occur in the submandibular gland, but can also occur in the parotid gland and in the sublingual and minor salivary glands.

Gland, Adrenal
Paired glands situated in the retroperitoneal tissues at the superior pole of each kidney.

Gland, Anterior Pituitary
The glandular or anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

Gland, Apocrine
Large, branched, specialized sweat glands that empty into the upper portion of a hair follicle instead of directly onto the skin.

Gland, Bulbourethral
Glands situated on each side of the prostate that secrete a fluid component of the seminal fluid into the urethra.

Gland, Cardiac
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gland, Desiccated Thyroid
A powder preparation of dried thyroid glands after the removal of fat and connective tissue. It is a yellowish to buff-colored amorphous powder containing 0.17-0.23% of iodine.

Gland, Eccrine
Simple sweat glands that secrete sweat directly onto the skin.

Gland, Endocrine
Ductless glands that secrete substances which are released directly into the circulation and which influence metabolism and other body functions.

Gland, Gastric
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gland, Harderian
A sebaceous gland that, in some animals, acts as an accessory to the lacrimal gland. The harderian gland excretes fluid that facilitates movement of the third eyelid.

Gland, Hibernating
A thermogenic form of adipose tissue found in newborns of many species, including humans, and in hibernating mammals. The tissue is capable of rapid liberation of energy and seems to be important in the maintenance of body temperature immediately after birth and upon waking from hibernation.

Gland, Interrenal
Structures in fishes homologous to the cortical tissue of the mammalian adrenal gland; they are in close proximity to or imbedded in the kidney.

Gland, Lacrimal
The tear-forming and tear-conducting system which includes the lacrimal glands, eyelid margins, conjunctival sac, and the tear drainage system.

Gland, Mammary
In humans, either of the mammary glands, consisting of fibrous tissue connecting the lobes and fatty tissue in between the lobes.

Gland, Meibomian
The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.

Gland, Metrial
Collection of granular epithelial cells in the uterine muscle beneath the placenta that develop during pregnancy in certain species of animals.

Gland, Minor Salivary
Accessory salivary glands located in the lip, cheek, tongue, floor of mouth, palate and intramaxillary.

Gland, Parathyroid
Two small paired endocrine glands in the region of the thyroid gland. They secrete parathyroid hormone and are concerned with the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus.

Gland, Pineal
A small conical midline body attached to the posterior part of the third ventricle and lying between the superior colliculi, below the splenium of the corpus callosum.

Gland, Pituitary
A small, unpaired gland situated in the sella turcica tissue. It is connected to the hypothalamus by a short stalk.

Gland, Posterior Pituitary
The neural or post-neural lobe of the pituitary gland. The infundibulum is considered part of the posterior pituitary by most authors.

Gland, Pyloric
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Gland, Rectal
A compound tubular gland, located around the eyes and nasal passages in marine animals and birds, the physiology of which figures in water-electrolyte balance. The Pekin duck serves as a common research animal in salt gland studies. A rectal gland or rectal salt gland in the dogfish shark is attached at the junction of the intestine and cloaca and aids the kidneys in removing excess salts from the blood. (Storer, Usinger, Stebbins & Nybakken: General Zoology, 6th ed, p658)

Gland, Salt
A compound tubular gland, located around the eyes and nasal passages in marine animals and birds, the physiology of which figures in water-electrolyte balance. The Pekin duck serves as a common research animal in salt gland studies. A rectal gland or rectal salt gland in the dogfish shark is attached at the junction of the intestine and cloaca and aids the kidneys in removing excess salts from the blood. (Storer, Usinger, Stebbins & Nybakken: General Zoology, 6th ed, p658)

Gland, Scent
Exocrine glands in animals which secrete scents which either repel or attract other animals, e.g. perianal glands of skunks, anal glands of weasels, musk glands of foxes, ventral glands of wood rats, and dorsal glands of peccaries.

Gland, Sebaceous
Small, sacculated organs found in the corium of the dermis. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent basement membrane enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into hair follicles, but some open on the general surface of the skin. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.

Gland, Submandibular
One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Gland, Submaxillary
One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Gland, Sweat
Sweat-producing structures that are embedded in the dermis. Each gland consists of a single tube, a coiled body, and a superficial duct.

Gland, Tarsal
The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.

Gland, Thymus
A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.

Gland, Thyroid
A highly vascular endocrine gland consisting of two lobes, one on either side of the trachea, joined by a narrow isthmus; it produces the thyroid hormones which are concerned in regulating the metabolic rate of the body.

Glander
A contagious disease of horses that can be transmitted to humans. It is caused by Pseudomonas mallei and characterized by ulceration of the respiratory mucosa and an eruption of nodules on the skin.

Glanders
A chronic debilitating disease of horses and other equids, as well as some members of the cat family, caused by Pseudomonas mallei; it is transmissible to humans. It attacks the mucous membranes of the nostrils of the horse, producing an increased and vitiated secretion and discharge of mucus, and enlargement and induration of the glands of the lower jaw.

Glands, Adrenal
Paired glands situated in the retroperitoneal tissues at the superior pole of each kidney.

Glands, Anterior Pituitary
The glandular or anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.

Glands, Apocrine
Large, branched, specialized sweat glands that empty into the upper portion of a hair follicle instead of directly onto the skin.

Glands, Bulbourethral
Glands situated on each side of the prostate that secrete a fluid component of the seminal fluid into the urethra.

Glands, Cardiac
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Glands, Eccrine
Simple sweat glands that secrete sweat directly onto the skin.

Glands, Endocrine
Ductless glands that secrete substances which are released directly into the circulation and which influence metabolism and other body functions.

Glands, Gastric
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Glands, Hibernating
A thermogenic form of adipose tissue found in newborns of many species, including humans, and in hibernating mammals. The tissue is capable of rapid liberation of energy and seems to be important in the maintenance of body temperature immediately after birth and upon waking from hibernation.

Glands, Interrenal
Structures in fishes homologous to the cortical tissue of the mammalian adrenal gland; they are in close proximity to or imbedded in the kidney.

Glands, Lacrimal
The tear-forming and tear-conducting system which includes the lacrimal glands, eyelid margins, conjunctival sac, and the tear drainage system.

Glands, Mammary
In humans, either of the mammary glands, consisting of fibrous tissue connecting the lobes and fatty tissue in between the lobes.

Glands, Meibomian
The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.

Glands, Metrial
Collection of granular epithelial cells in the uterine muscle beneath the placenta that develop during pregnancy in certain species of animals.

Glands, Minor Salivary
Accessory salivary glands located in the lip, cheek, tongue, floor of mouth, palate and intramaxillary.

Glands, Parathyroid
Two small paired endocrine glands in the region of the thyroid gland. They secrete parathyroid hormone and are concerned with the metabolism of calcium and phosphorus.

Glands, Pineal
A small conical midline body attached to the posterior part of the third ventricle and lying between the superior colliculi, below the splenium of the corpus callosum.

Glands, Pituitary
A small, unpaired gland situated in the sella turcica tissue. It is connected to the hypothalamus by a short stalk.

Glands, Posterior Pituitary
The neural or post-neural lobe of the pituitary gland. The infundibulum is considered part of the posterior pituitary by most authors.

Glands, Pyloric
Surface epithelium in the stomach that invaginates into the lamina propria, forming gastric pits. Tubular glands, characteristic of each region of the stomach (cardiac, gastric, and pyloric), empty into the gastric pits. The gastric mucosa is made up of several different kinds of cells.

Glands, Rectal
A compound tubular gland, located around the eyes and nasal passages in marine animals and birds, the physiology of which figures in water-electrolyte balance. The Pekin duck serves as a common research animal in salt gland studies. A rectal gland or rectal salt gland in the dogfish shark is attached at the junction of the intestine and cloaca and aids the kidneys in removing excess salts from the blood. (Storer, Usinger, Stebbins & Nybakken: General Zoology, 6th ed, p658)

Glands, Salt
A compound tubular gland, located around the eyes and nasal passages in marine animals and birds, the physiology of which figures in water-electrolyte balance. The Pekin duck serves as a common research animal in salt gland studies. A rectal gland or rectal salt gland in the dogfish shark is attached at the junction of the intestine and cloaca and aids the kidneys in removing excess salts from the blood. (Storer, Usinger, Stebbins & Nybakken: General Zoology, 6th ed, p658)

Glands, Scent
Exocrine glands in animals which secrete scents which either repel or attract other animals, e.g. perianal glands of skunks, anal glands of weasels, musk glands of foxes, ventral glands of wood rats, and dorsal glands of peccaries.

Glands, Sebaceous
Small, sacculated organs found in the corium of the dermis. Each gland has a single duct that emerges from a cluster of oval alveoli. Each alveolus consists of a transparent basement membrane enclosing epithelial cells. The ducts from most sebaceous glands open into hair follicles, but some open on the general surface of the skin. Sebaceous glands secrete SEBUM.

Glands, Submandibular
One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Glands, Submaxillary
One of two salivary glands in the neck, located in the space bound by the two bellies of the digastric muscle and the angle of the mandible. It discharges through the submandibular duct. The secretory units are predominantly serous although a few mucous alveoli, some with serous demilunes, occur. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Glands, Sweat
Sweat-producing structures that are embedded in the dermis. Each gland consists of a single tube, a coiled body, and a superficial duct.

Glands, Tarsal
The sebaceous glands situated on the inner surface of the eyelids between the tarsal plates and CONJUNCTIVA.

Glands, Thymus
A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.

Glands, Thyroid
A highly vascular endocrine gland consisting of two lobes, one on either side of the trachea, joined by a narrow isthmus; it produces the thyroid hormones which are concerned in regulating the metabolic rate of the body.

Glandular and Epithelial Neoplasms
Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.

Glandular Epithelial Neoplasm
Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.

Glandular Epithelial Neoplasms
Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.

Glandular Kallikrein
A family of trpysin-like SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that are expressed in a variety of cell types including human prostate epithelial cells. They are formed from tissue prokallikrein by action with TRYPSIN. They are highly similar to PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN. EC 3.4.21.35.

Glandular Kallikrein 1
A family of trpysin-like SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that are expressed in a variety of cell types including human prostate epithelial cells. They are formed from tissue prokallikrein by action with TRYPSIN. They are highly similar to PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN. EC 3.4.21.35.

Glandular Kallikreins, Human
A family of trpysin-like SERINE ENDOPEPTIDASES that are expressed in a variety of cell types including human prostate epithelial cells. They are formed from tissue prokallikrein by action with TRYPSIN. They are highly similar to PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN. EC 3.4.21.35.

Glandular Neoplasm
Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.

Glandular Neoplasms
Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.

Glanzmann Thrombasthenia
A congenital bleeding disorder with prolonged bleeding time, absence of aggregation of platelets in response to most agents, especially ADP, and impaired or absent clot retraction. Platelet membranes are deficient in or have a defect in the glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX).



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
--------------------------------------

Geriatrics
The branch of medicine devoted to the elderly.

Germ
A disease-causing microorganism.

German measles
See rubella.

Giantism
Abnormal growth of the body due to an excessive amount of growth hormone produced by the pituitary gland.

Giardiasis
A diarrheal illness caused by infection with Giardia lamblia, a parasitic protozoan.

Gland

Glossitis
Inflammation of the tongue.

Graft
A piece of skin or other tissue used as a transplant.

Groin
The region of the body where the thigh and lower abdomen meet.

Guillain-Barr? syndrome
A rare but reversible reaction to a viral illness or immunization that causes partial to complete loss of movement of certain muscles, weakness, numbness and tingling. In the severe form, a person may need intensive care and breathing support.

Gait
Pattern of walking.

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