Fibroadenosis
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  Fibroadenosis



Fibroadenosis

   A benign neoplasm composed of glandular and fibrous tissues, with a relatively large proportion of glands. (Stedman, 25th ed)

RELATED TERMS
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Benign
Non-malignant; not life-threatening.

Neoplasm
New and abnormal growth of tissue that may or may not cause cancer. Also called tumor.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Fibrates for lowering cholesterol
Fibrates are cholesterol-lowering drugs that are primarily effective in lowering triglycerides and, to a lesser extent, in increasing HDL-cholesterol levels.

Fibre, Stress
Bundles of actin filaments (MICROFILAMENTS) and myosin-II that span across the cell attaching to the cell membrane at FOCAL ADHESIONS and to the network of INTERMEDIATE FILAMENTS that surrounds the nucleus.

Fibril
The diminutive of fiber. A small fiber, a fine thread.

Fibril Associated Collagen
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.

Fibril Associated Collagens
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.

Fibril Associated Collagens With Interrupted Triple Helices
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.

Fibril Protein, Scrapie Associated
Protease-resistant core of PrPSC, the abnormal isoform of prion proteins (PRIONS). PrP 27-30 is produced by limited proteolysis of the N-terminus of PrPSc.

Fibril, Reticular
A scleroprotein fibril consisting mostly of type III collagen. Reticulin fibrils are extremely thin, with a diameter of between 0.5 and 2 um. They are involved in maintaining the structural integrity in a variety of organs.

Fibril, Reticulin
A scleroprotein fibril consisting mostly of type III collagen. Reticulin fibrils are extremely thin, with a diameter of between 0.5 and 2 um. They are involved in maintaining the structural integrity in a variety of organs.

Fibril-Associated Collagen
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.

Fibril-Associated Collagens
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.

Fibril-Associated Collagens With Interrupted Triple Helices
A family of non-fibrillar collagens that interact with FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS. They contain short triple helical domains interrupted by short non-helical domains and do not form into collagen fibrils.

Fibril-Protein, Scrapie Associated
Protease-resistant core of PrPSC, the abnormal isoform of prion proteins (PRIONS). PrP 27-30 is produced by limited proteolysis of the N-terminus of PrPSc.

Fibril-Protein, Scrapie-Associated
Protease-resistant core of PrPSC, the abnormal isoform of prion proteins (PRIONS). PrP 27-30 is produced by limited proteolysis of the N-terminus of PrPSc.

Fibrillar Collagen
A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.

Fibrillar Collagens
A family of structurally related collagens that form the characteristic collagen fibril bundles seen in CONNECTIVE TISSUE.

Fibrillary Astrocytoma
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)

Fibrillary Astrocytomas
Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)

Fibrillary Chorea
Successive and rapid contractions of motor units associated with chronic nerve injury. The discharges arise from the peripheral aspects of regenerating nerves, and clinically impart a nearly continuous undulation of the body surface overlying the muscle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1491)

Fibrillary Choreas
Successive and rapid contractions of motor units associated with chronic nerve injury. The discharges arise from the peripheral aspects of regenerating nerves, and clinically impart a nearly continuous undulation of the body surface overlying the muscle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1491)

Fibrillation
Rapid contractions of the heart muscles.

Fibrillation, atrial
An abnormal irregular heart rhythm whereby electrical signals are generated chaotically throughout the upper chambers (atria) of the heart. Although many persons with atrial fibrillation have no symptoms, the most common symptom is palpitations, an uncomfortable awareness of the rapid and irregular heartbeat. Atrial fibrillation can cause blood clots that travel from the heart to the brain, causing stroke. Treatment of atrial fibrillation involves controlling the risk factors, medications to slow the heart rate and/or convert the heart to normal rhythm, and preventing complications of blood clotting.

Fibrillation, Atrial
Disorder of cardiac rhythm characterized by rapid, irregular atrial impulses and ineffective atrial contractions.

Fibrillation, auricular
Essentially the same as atrial fibrillation.

Fibrillation, Auricular
Disorder of cardiac rhythm characterized by rapid, irregular atrial impulses and ineffective atrial contractions.

Fibrillation, ventricular
An abnormal irregular heart rhythm whereby there are very rapid uncoordinated fluttering contractions of the lower chambers (ventricles) of the heart. Ventricular fibrillation disrupts the synchrony between the heartbeat and the pulse beat. Ventricular fibrillation is commonly associated with heart attacks or scarring of the heart muscle from previous heart attack. Ventricular fibrillation is life threatening.

Fibrillations, Atrial
Disorder of cardiac rhythm characterized by rapid, irregular atrial impulses and ineffective atrial contractions.

Fibrillations, Auricular
Disorder of cardiac rhythm characterized by rapid, irregular atrial impulses and ineffective atrial contractions.

Fibrils, Reticular
A scleroprotein fibril consisting mostly of type III collagen. Reticulin fibrils are extremely thin, with a diameter of between 0.5 and 2 um. They are involved in maintaining the structural integrity in a variety of organs.

Fibrils, Reticulin
A scleroprotein fibril consisting mostly of type III collagen. Reticulin fibrils are extremely thin, with a diameter of between 0.5 and 2 um. They are involved in maintaining the structural integrity in a variety of organs.

Fibrils, Scrapie Associated
Protease-resistant core of PrPSC, the abnormal isoform of prion proteins (PRIONS). PrP 27-30 is produced by limited proteolysis of the N-terminus of PrPSc.

Fibrils, Scrapie-Associated
Protease-resistant core of PrPSC, the abnormal isoform of prion proteins (PRIONS). PrP 27-30 is produced by limited proteolysis of the N-terminus of PrPSc.

Fibrin
A filamentous protein formed from the precursor fibrinogen by the enzyme thrombin.

Fibrin Adhesive
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrin Degradation Products
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.

Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.

Fibrin Fibrinogen Split Products
Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.

Fibrin Foam
A dry artificial sterile sponge of fibrin prepared by clotting with thrombin a foam or solution of fibrinogen. It is used in conjunction with thrombin as a hemostatic in surgery at sites where bleeding cannot be controlled by more common methods. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p648)

Fibrin Glue
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrin Klebe System Immuno
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrin Seal
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrin Sealant
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrin Sealant System
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrin Stabilizing Factor
A fibrin stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade.

Fibrin Tissue Adhesive
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrinase
A fibrin stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade.

Fibrinogen
The protein from which is generated fibrin, the essence of a normal blood clot.

Fibrinogen Adhesive
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing fibrinogen and thrombin. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, Factor VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as aprotinin. Mixing of the two components promotes clotting and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, hemostasis, and wound healing.

Fibrinogen Deficiencies
A deficiency or absence of fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibrinogen Deficiency
A deficiency or absence of fibrinogen (coagulation factor I) in the blood. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibrinogens, Abnormal
Fibrinogens which have a functional defect as the result of one or more amino acid substitutions in the amino acid sequence of normal fibrinogen. Abnormalities of the fibrinogen molecule may impair any of the major steps involved in the conversion of fibrinogen into stabilized fibrin, such as cleavage of the fibrinopeptides by thrombin, polymerization and cross-linking of fibrin. The resulting dysfibrinogenemias can be clinically silent or can be associated with bleeding, thrombosis or defective wound healing.

Fibrinoligase
Activated form of FACTOR XIII, a transglutaminase, which stabilizes the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) culminating the blood coagulation cascade.

Fibrinolyses
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.

Fibrinolysin
A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.

Fibrinolysis
The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.

Fibrinolytic Agents
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to fibrinolysin (PLASMIN).

Fibrinolytic Drugs
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to fibrinolysin (PLASMIN).

Fibrinolytic Therapies
Use of infusions of fibrinolytic agents to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.

Fibrinolytic Therapy
Use of infusions of fibrinolytic agents to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.

Fibrinopeptide A
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.

Fibrinopeptide B
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the beta chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin. Each peptide chain contains 20 amino acid residues. The removal of fibrinopeptides B is not required for coagulation.

Fibrinopeptides A
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.

Fibrinopeptides B
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the beta chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin. Each peptide chain contains 20 amino acid residues. The removal of fibrinopeptides B is not required for coagulation.

Fibro Odontoma
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibro odontoma, Ameloblastic
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibro-Odontoma
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibro-odontoma, Ameloblastic
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibro-Odontomas
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibro-odontomas, Ameloblastic
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibroadenoma
Noncancerous, firm, rubbery lump in the breast that is painless and moves around easily when touched.

Fibroadenomas
An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroblast
A connective tissue cell.

Fibroblast Collagenase
A member of the MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES that cleaves triple-helical collagens types I, II, and III. EC 3.4.24.34.

Fibroblast Growth Factor
A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.

Fibroblast Growth Factor 1
A 17 kD single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of ANGIOGENESIS. It binds to HEPARIN, which potentiates its biological activity and protects it from proteolysis. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages, and also has chemotactic and mitogenic activities. It was originally named acidic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from basic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 2).

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
A single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of ANGIOGENESIS. Several different forms of the human protein exist ranging from 18-24 kDa in size due to the use of alternative start sites within the fgf-2 gene. It has a 55 percent amino acid residue identity to FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1 and has potent heparin-binding activity. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages. It was originally named basic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from acidic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1).

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor
Specific molecular sites or structures on cell membranes that react with FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTORS (both the basic and acidic forms), their analogs, or their antagonists to elicit or to inhibit the specific response of the cell to these factors. These receptors frequently possess tyrosine kinase activity.

Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2
A mutation (change) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene on chromosome 10 causes the best-known type of acrocephalosyndactyly, namely Apert syndrome which is characterized by abnormalities of the skull and face and the hands and feet. There is premature closure of some of the sutures of the skull (craniosynostosis) resulting in an abnormally shaped head (which is unusually tall but short from front-to-back) and an abnormally shaped face with shallow eye sockets and underdevelopment of the midface. There is fusion of fingers and toes (syndactyly) and broad ends of the thumbs and big toes. Surgery is often useful with the skull, face, hands and feet. Different mutations in FGFR2 are responsible for two other genetic diseases, namely, Pfeiffer syndrome (another type of acrocephalosyndactyly) and Crouzon syndrome (purely a craniofacial disorder with no hand or foot problems). All are inherited as dominant traits.

Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors
Specific molecular sites or structures on cell membranes that react with FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTORS (both the basic and acidic forms), their analogs, or their antagonists to elicit or to inhibit the specific response of the cell to these factors. These receptors frequently possess tyrosine kinase activity.

Fibroblast Growth Factor, Acidic
A 17 kD single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of ANGIOGENESIS. It binds to HEPARIN, which potentiates its biological activity and protects it from proteolysis. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages, and also has chemotactic and mitogenic activities. It was originally named acidic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from basic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 2).

Fibroblast Growth Factor, Basic
A single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of ANGIOGENESIS. Several different forms of the human protein exist ranging from 18-24 kDa in size due to the use of alternative start sites within the fgf-2 gene. It has a 55 percent amino acid residue identity to FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1 and has potent heparin-binding activity. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages. It was originally named basic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from acidic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1).

Fibroblast Growth Factor-1
A 17 kD single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of ANGIOGENESIS. It binds to HEPARIN, which potentiates its biological activity and protects it from proteolysis. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages, and also has chemotactic and mitogenic activities. It was originally named acidic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from basic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 2).

Fibroblast Growth Factor-2
A single-chain polypeptide growth factor that plays a significant role in the process of WOUND HEALING and is a potent inducer of ANGIOGENESIS. Several different forms of the human protein exist ranging from 18-24 kDa in size due to the use of alternative start sites within the fgf-2 gene. It has a 55 percent amino acid residue identity to FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1 and has potent heparin-binding activity. The growth factor is an extremely potent inducer of DNA synthesis in a variety of cell types from mesoderm and neuroectoderm lineages. It was originally named basic fibroblast growth factor based upon its chemical properties and to distinguish it from acidic fibroblast growth factor (FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR 1).

Fibroblast Growth Factors
A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.

Fibroblast Growth Regulatory Factor
A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.

Fibroblast Interferon
One of the type I interferons produced by fibroblasts in response to stimulation by live or inactivated virus or by double-stranded RNA. It is a cytokine with antiviral, antiproliferative, and immunomodulating activity.

Fibroblast Intermediate Filament Proteins
Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.

Fibroblast Virus, Human, Permanent
A genus of the family RETROVIRIDAE consisting of viruses with either type B or type D morphology. This includes a few exogenous, vertically transmitted and endogenous viruses of mice (type B) and some primate and sheep viruses (type D). MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS, MOUSE is the type species.

Fibroblast-Derived Neutrophil-Activating Peptides
A cytokine that activates neutrophils and attracts neutrophils and T-lymphocytes. It is released by several cell types including monocytes, macrophages, T-lymphocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes by an inflammatory stimulus. IL-8 is a member of the beta-thromboglobulin superfamily and structurally related to platelet factor 4.

Fibroblasts
Connective tissue cells which secrete an extracellular matrix rich in collagen and other macromolecules.

Fibrocartilage
A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix of type II COLLAGEN and CHONDROITIN SULFATE. It is divided into three types: hyaline cartilage, fibrocartilage, and yellow or elastic white fibrocartilage.

Fibrocartilages
A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix of type II COLLAGEN and CHONDROITIN SULFATE. It is divided into three types: hyaline cartilage, fibrocartilage, and yellow or elastic white fibrocartilage.

Fibrocid
A sulfated pentosyl polysaccharide with heparin-like properties.

Fibrocystic breasts
Noncancerous condition in which small lumps and cysts develop in the breasts.

Fibrocystic Disease of Breast
A chronic disorder comprising three variants which range from lesions consisting primarily of an overgrowth of fibrous tissue to those characterized by dominance of the proliferation of the epithelial parenchyma to a form of dysplasia characterized by both stromal and epithelial hyperplasia with the formation of cysts.

Fibrocystic Disease of Pancreas
An inherited disease of exocrine glands, affecting most characteristically the pancreas, respiratory system, and sweat glands, usually beginning in infancy and typified by chronic respiratory infections, pancreatic insufficiency, and susceptibility to heat prostration. Cirrhosis of liver occurring in childhood is common and may produce portal hypertension, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism.

Fibrocystic Mastopathies
A chronic disorder comprising three variants which range from lesions consisting primarily of an overgrowth of fibrous tissue to those characterized by dominance of the proliferation of the epithelial parenchyma to a form of dysplasia characterized by both stromal and epithelial hyperplasia with the formation of cysts.

Fibrocystic Mastopathy
A chronic disorder comprising three variants which range from lesions consisting primarily of an overgrowth of fibrous tissue to those characterized by dominance of the proliferation of the epithelial parenchyma to a form of dysplasia characterized by both stromal and epithelial hyperplasia with the formation of cysts.

Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva
A disease characterized by bony deposits or the ossification of muscle tissue.

Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP)
A rare but dramatic genetic disorder that turns muscles, tendons and ligaments into bone, threatening to transform the victim into "a statue of stone." FOP is characterized by physical handicap due to bone forming in the wrong places and malformed big toes which often contain only one bone. Other features of FOP can include short thumbs, fifth finger clinodactyly (pinkie curved toward the thumb), malformed cervical (neck) vertebrae, short broad neck of the femur (thighbone), deafness, scalp baldness, and mild mental retardation.

Fibroelastoses, Endocardial
A condition characterized by hypertrophy of the wall of the left ventricle and conversion of the endocardium into a thick fibroelastic coat, with the capacity of the ventricle sometimes reduced, but often increased. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroelastosis, Endocardial
A condition characterized by hypertrophy of the wall of the left ventricle and conversion of the endocardium into a thick fibroelastic coat, with the capacity of the ventricle sometimes reduced, but often increased. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroepithelial Neoplasm
Neoplasms composed of fibrous and epithelial tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue or epithelium.

Fibroepithelial Neoplasms
Neoplasms composed of fibrous and epithelial tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue or epithelium.

Fibroid
A noncancerous tumor of the uterus composed of muscle fibers. Also called uterine myoma.

Fibroid Tumor
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibroid Tumors
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibroid Uterus
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibroid, Uterine
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibroids
Noncancerous growths in, on, or within the walls of the uterus that develop from muscle cells in the wall of the uterus.

Fibroids, Uterine
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibroma
A mass composed of fibrous tissue or connective tissue. Also called a fibroid tumor or fibroid.

Fibroma Virus, Rabbit
A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.

Fibroma Virus, Shope
A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.

Fibroma Viruses, Rabbit
A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.

Fibroma, cemento-ossifying
A hard fibrous lesion that continues to grow, sometimes to very large size, unless treated, most frequently seen in the jaw or mouth, sometimes in connection with a fracture or another type of injury. Treatment is by surgery. Abbreviated COF.

Fibroma, desmoplastic
A rare type of primary bone tumor characteristically composed of well-differentiated cells that produce collagen. Desmoplastic fibromas are discovered most often in the first three decades of life, in the mandible (the femur and pelvis are also favored sites). Although benign, these tumors are locally infiltrative and may cause pain and swelling or an effusion (if near a joint). Treatment is surgical removal but the tumor may recur.

Fibroma, Desmoplastic
A extremely rare bone tumor characterized by abundant collagen formation and a fibrous stroma, without evidence of mitosis or pleomorphism. It appears on x-rays as an osteolytic lesion with well-defined margins and must be differentiated from primary fibrosarcoma of bone. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1441)

Fibroma, nonossifying
A growing lesion with a fibroma structure. Treatment is by surgery.

Fibroma, Ossifying
A benign, relatively slow-growing, central bone tumor, usually of the jaws (especially the mandible) which is composed of fibrous connective tissue within which bone is formed. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroma, Shope
Infections produced by oncogenic viruses. The infections caused by DNA viruses are less numerous but more diverse than those caused by the RNA oncogenic viruses.

Fibroma, Uterine
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibromas
A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.

Fibromas, Desmoplastic
A extremely rare bone tumor characterized by abundant collagen formation and a fibrous stroma, without evidence of mitosis or pleomorphism. It appears on x-rays as an osteolytic lesion with well-defined margins and must be differentiated from primary fibrosarcoma of bone. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1441)

Fibromas, Ossifying
A benign, relatively slow-growing, central bone tumor, usually of the jaws (especially the mandible) which is composed of fibrous connective tissue within which bone is formed. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibromas, Uterine
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibromatoses
A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.

Fibromatoses, Abdominal
A relatively large mass of unusually firm scarlike connective tissue resulting from active participation of fibroblasts, occurring most frequently in the abdominal muscles of women who have borne children. The fibroblasts infiltrate surrounding muscle and fascia. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Fibromatoses, Aggressive
A childhood counterpart of abdominal or extra-abdominal desmoid tumors, characterized by firm subcutaneous nodules that grow rapidly in any part of the body but do not metastasize. The adult form of abdominal fibromatosis is FIBROMATOSIS, ABDOMINAL. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Fibromatoses, Gingival
Generalized or localized diffuse fibrous overgrowth of the gingival tissue, usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, but some cases are idiopathic and others produced by drugs. The enlarged gingiva is pink, firm, and has a leather-like consistency with a minutely pebbled surface and in severe cases the teeth are almost completely covered and the enlargement projects into the oral vestibule. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Fibromatosis
A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.

Fibromatosis Gingivae
Generalized or localized diffuse fibrous overgrowth of the gingival tissue, usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, but some cases are idiopathic and others produced by drugs. The enlarged gingiva is pink, firm, and has a leather-like consistency with a minutely pebbled surface and in severe cases the teeth are almost completely covered and the enlargement projects into the oral vestibule. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Fibromatosis Virus of Rabbits
A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.

Fibromatosis Virus, Rabbit
A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.

Fibromatosis Viruses, Rabbit
A species of LEPORIPOXVIRUS causing subcutaneous localized swellings in rabbits, usually on the feet.

Fibromatosis, Abdominal
A relatively large mass of unusually firm scarlike connective tissue resulting from active participation of fibroblasts, occurring most frequently in the abdominal muscles of women who have borne children. The fibroblasts infiltrate surrounding muscle and fascia. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Fibromatosis, Aggressive
A childhood counterpart of abdominal or extra-abdominal desmoid tumors, characterized by firm subcutaneous nodules that grow rapidly in any part of the body but do not metastasize. The adult form of abdominal fibromatosis is FIBROMATOSIS, ABDOMINAL. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Fibromatosis, Gingival
Generalized or localized diffuse fibrous overgrowth of the gingival tissue, usually transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, but some cases are idiopathic and others produced by drugs. The enlarged gingiva is pink, firm, and has a leather-like consistency with a minutely pebbled surface and in severe cases the teeth are almost completely covered and the enlargement projects into the oral vestibule. (Dorland, 28th ed)

Fibromuscular Dysplasia
An idiopathic, segmental, nonatheromatous disease of the musculature of arterial walls, leading to stenosis of small and medium-sized arteries. Most commonly affected are the renal arteries; involvement of the axillary, iliac, basilar, carotid, hepatic and intracranial arteries have been reported.

Fibromuscular Dysplasias
An idiopathic, segmental, nonatheromatous disease of the musculature of arterial walls, leading to stenosis of small and medium-sized arteries. Most commonly affected are the renal arteries; involvement of the axillary, iliac, basilar, carotid, hepatic and intracranial arteries have been reported.

Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia is a debilitating chronic syndrome (constellation of signs and symptoms) characterized by diffuse pain, fatigue, and a wide range of other symptoms. It is not contagious, and recent studies suggest that people with fibromyalgia may be genetically predispose. It affects more women than men, with a ratio globally of 3-5:1. Fibromyalgia is seen in 3-10% of the general population, and is mostly found between the ages 20 and 50.

Fibromyalgia Fibromyositis Syndrome
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgia, Primary
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgia, Secondary
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgia-Fibromyositis Syndrome
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgia-Fibromyositis Syndromes
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgias
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgias, Primary
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyalgias, Secondary
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyoma
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibromyomas
A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the uterus and the gastrointestinal tract but can occur in the skin and subcutaneous tissues, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.

Fibromyositis Fibromyalgia Syndrome
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyositis-Fibromyalgia Syndrome
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyositis-Fibromyalgia Syndromes
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibromyxoma
A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.

Fibromyxomas
A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.

Fibronectin
Glycoproteins found on the surfaces of cells, particularly in fibrillar structures. The proteins are lost or reduced when these cells undergo viral or chemical transformation. They are highly susceptible to proteolysis and are substrates for activated blood coagulation factor VIII. The forms present in plasma are called cold-insoluble globulins.

Fibronectin Receptors
Specific sites or molecular structures on or in cells with which fibronectins react or to which they bind. Studies have shown that these receptors function in certain types of adhesive contact as well as playing a major role in matrix assembly. These are the traditional fibronectin receptors, also called VLA-5 receptors or alpha 5 beta 1 integrins. There are also other integrins that bind fibronectin, including alpha v beta 1.

Fibronectins
Glycoproteins found on the surfaces of cells, particularly in fibrillar structures. The proteins are lost or reduced when these cells undergo viral or chemical transformation. They are highly susceptible to proteolysis and are substrates for activated blood coagulation factor VIII. The forms present in plasma are called cold-insoluble globulins.

Fibroodontoma
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibroodontomas
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibroplasia, Retrolental
A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroplasias, Retrolental
A bilateral retinopathy occurring in premature infants treated with excessively high concentrations of oxygen, characterized by vascular dilatation, proliferation, and tortuosity, edema, and retinal detachment, with ultimate conversion of the retina into a fibrous mass that can be seen as a dense retrolental membrane. Usually growth of the eye is arrested and may result in microophthalmia, and blindness may occur. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibrosarcoma
A malignant tumor that begins in fibrous connective tissue at the ends of the arm or leg bones and may spread to surrounding soft tissue. Fibrosarcoma is the most common soft tissue sarcoma found in children under one year of age. It presents as a rapidly growing mass at birth or early infancy. Fibrosarcoma can also occur in older children and adults. The symptoms may include a lump, soreness, pain, or a limp (if the tumor is in the leg).

Fibrosarcomas
A sarcoma derived from deep fibrous tissue, characterized by bundles of immature proliferating fibroblasts with variable collagen formation, which tends to invade locally and metastasize by the bloodstream. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Fibroses
Any pathological condition where fibrous connective tissue invades any organ, usually as a consequence of inflammation or other injury.

Fibroses, Bone Marrow
Replacement of the bone marrow by fibrous tissue, occurring in association with a myeloproliferative disorder or secondary to another, unrelated condition. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroses, Endomyocardial
A disease characterized by thickening of the endocardium, and frequently the inner third of the myocardium. The left ventricle is most frequently involved. Cardiomegaly and congestive heart failure may also be present.

Fibroses, Liver
Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.

Fibroses, Pulmonary
Chronic inflammation and progressive fibrosis of the pulmonary alveolar walls, with steadily progressive dyspnea, resulting finally in death from oxygen lack or right heart failure.

Fibroses, Radiation
Injurious effects of radiotherapy on the lungs. There are three phases in the reaction of the lungs to radiation injury: an acute phase occurring 1 to 2 months after exposure, a subacute phase 2 to 9 months after exposure, and a chronic or fibrotic phase more than 9 months after exposure. In the acute phase there is vascular damage, congestion, edema, and mononuclear cell infiltration; in the subacute phase the alveolar walls are infiltrated with mononuclear inflammatory cells and fibroblasts; in the chronic phase, alveolar fibrosis and capillary sclerosis take place. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2343)

Fibroses, Retroperitoneal
A slowly progressive condition of unknown etiology, characterized by deposition of fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneal space compressing the ureters, great vessels, bile duct, and other structures. When associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm, it may be called chronic periaortitis or inflammatory perianeurysmal fibrosis.

Fibrosing Alveolitides
Chronic inflammation and progressive fibrosis of the pulmonary alveolar walls, with steadily progressive dyspnea, resulting finally in death from oxygen lack or right heart failure.

Fibrosing Alveolitis
Chronic inflammation and progressive fibrosis of the pulmonary alveolar walls, with steadily progressive dyspnea, resulting finally in death from oxygen lack or right heart failure.

Fibrosis
The presence of scar tissue or collagen fibers in any tissue. In the liver, fibrosis or scarring of the liver damages the architecture and thus the functionality of the organ. Fibrosis, combined with the liverís ability to regenerate, causes cirrhosis (regeneration within the scar tissue).

Fibrosis, Bone Marrow
Replacement of the bone marrow by fibrous tissue, occurring in association with a myeloproliferative disorder or secondary to another, unrelated condition. (Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibrosis, cystic
One of the most common grave genetic (inherited) diseases, CF affects the exocrine glands and is characterized by the production of abnormal secretions, leading to mucous build-up.

Fibrosis, Cystic
An inherited disease of exocrine glands, affecting most characteristically the pancreas, respiratory system, and sweat glands, usually beginning in infancy and typified by chronic respiratory infections, pancreatic insufficiency, and susceptibility to heat prostration. Cirrhosis of liver occurring in childhood is common and may produce portal hypertension, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism.

Fibrosis, Endomyocardial
A disease characterized by thickening of the endocardium, and frequently the inner third of the myocardium. The left ventricle is most frequently involved. Cardiomegaly and congestive heart failure may also be present.

Fibrosis, Inflammatory Perianeurysmal
A slowly progressive condition of unknown etiology, characterized by deposition of fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneal space compressing the ureters, great vessels, bile duct, and other structures. When associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm, it may be called chronic periaortitis or inflammatory perianeurysmal fibrosis.

Fibrosis, Liver
Liver disease in which the normal microcirculation, the gross vascular anatomy, and the hepatic architecture have been variably destroyed and altered with fibrous septa surrounding regenerated or regenerating parenchymal nodules.

Fibrosis, Pancreatic Cystic
An inherited disease of exocrine glands, affecting most characteristically the pancreas, respiratory system, and sweat glands, usually beginning in infancy and typified by chronic respiratory infections, pancreatic insufficiency, and susceptibility to heat prostration. Cirrhosis of liver occurring in childhood is common and may produce portal hypertension, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism.

Fibrosis, Perianeurysmal Inflammatory
A slowly progressive condition of unknown etiology, characterized by deposition of fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneal space compressing the ureters, great vessels, bile duct, and other structures. When associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm, it may be called chronic periaortitis or inflammatory perianeurysmal fibrosis.

Fibrosis, Pulmonary
Chronic inflammation and progressive fibrosis of the pulmonary alveolar walls, with steadily progressive dyspnea, resulting finally in death from oxygen lack or right heart failure.

Fibrosis, radiation
Scarring of the lungs from radiation. Radiation fibrosis is a sequel of radiation pneumonitis (inflammation of the lungs due to radiation), as from radiation therapy. Radiation pneumonitis typically occurs after radiation treatments for cancer within the chest or breast and usually manifests itself 2 weeks to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. Symptoms include shortness of breath upon activity, cough and fever. Radiation pneumonitis frequently is discovered as an incidental finding on chest x-ray in patients who have no symptoms.

Fibrosis, Radiation
Injurious effects of radiotherapy on the lungs. There are three phases in the reaction of the lungs to radiation injury: an acute phase occurring 1 to 2 months after exposure, a subacute phase 2 to 9 months after exposure, and a chronic or fibrotic phase more than 9 months after exposure. In the acute phase there is vascular damage, congestion, edema, and mononuclear cell infiltration; in the subacute phase the alveolar walls are infiltrated with mononuclear inflammatory cells and fibroblasts; in the chronic phase, alveolar fibrosis and capillary sclerosis take place. (Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p2343)

Fibrosis, Retroperitoneal
A slowly progressive condition of unknown etiology, characterized by deposition of fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneal space compressing the ureters, great vessels, bile duct, and other structures. When associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm, it may be called chronic periaortitis or inflammatory perianeurysmal fibrosis.

Fibrositides
A common nonarticular rheumatic syndrome characterized by myalgia and multiple points of focal muscle tenderness to palpation (trigger points). Muscle pain is typically aggravated by inactivity or exposure to cold. This condition is often associated with general symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, fatigue, stiffness, HEADACHES, and occasionally DEPRESSION. There is significant overlap between fibromyalgia and the chronic fatigue syndrome (FATIGUE SYNDROME, CHRONIC). Fibromyalgia may arise as a primary or secondary disease process. It is most frequent in females aged 20 to 50 years. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1494-95)

Fibrositis
Inflammation of fibrous connective tissues in muscles. It often affects the muscles of the trunk and back. It may be a symptom of another disease, such as Sciatica, but in most cases the cause is unknown. Pain and stiffness.

Fibrospum
A dry artificial sterile sponge of fibrin prepared by clotting with thrombin a foam or solution of fibrinogen. It is used in conjunction with thrombin as a hemostatic in surgery at sites where bleeding cannot be controlled by more common methods. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p648)

Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone
A disease of bone marked by thinning of the cortex and replacement of bone marrow by gritty fibrous tissue containing bony spicules, producing pain, disability, and gradually increasing deformity. Only one bone may be involved (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, MONOSTOTIC) or several (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, POLYOSTOTIC). (From Dorland, 28th ed)

Fibrous dysplasia, monostotic
Excessive growth of hard fibrous tissue that replaces normal bone tissue in a single bone. Symptoms may include pain and fracture of the bone. Most cases are diagnosed in adolescence and young adulthood and remain unchanged throughout life. The prognosis (outlook) is usually very good.

Fibrous Dysplasia, Monostotic
FIBROUS DYSPLASIA OF BONE involving only one bone.

Fibrous dysplasia, polyostotic
A genetic disorder of bones, skin pigmentation and hormonal problems with premature sexual development. Also called McCune-Albright syndrome or the Albright syndrome. In the syndrome, there is bone disease with fractures and deformity of the legs, arms and skull; pigment patches of the skin; and endocrine (hormonal) disease with early puberty (early menstrual bleeding, development of breasts and pubic hair) and an increased rate of growth. Polyostotic fibrous dysplasia is usually caused by mosaicism for a mutation in a gene called GNAS1 (Guanine Nucleotide binding protein, Alpha Stimulating activity polypeptide 1).

Fibrous Dysplasias, Monostotic
FIBROUS DYSPLASIA OF BONE involving only one bone.

Fibrous Histiocytoma
A tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of histiocytes and with various fibroblastic components. There are many variants and many names. Superficially located histiocytic lesions behave benignly but deep, benign histiocytomas may invade locally into surrounding tissue. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. Superficial lesions are always cured by simple excision; a wider margin of tissue should be obtained for deep, benign types. Local recurrence is uncommon. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Fibrous Histiocytomas
A tumor composed, wholly or in part, of cells with the morphologic characteristics of histiocytes and with various fibroblastic components. There are many variants and many names. Superficially located histiocytic lesions behave benignly but deep, benign histiocytomas may invade locally into surrounding tissue. Fibrous histiocytomas can occur anywhere in the body. Superficial lesions are always cured by simple excision; a wider margin of tissue should be obtained for deep, benign types. Local recurrence is uncommon. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Fibrous Meningioma
A relatively common neoplasm of the central nervous system that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and spinal canal. They tend to present in the fourth to sixth decades of life with signs indicative of a slowly progressive mass lesion. Specific clinical manifestations depend on the location of the tumor, but may include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, cranial neuropathies, ataxia, and other focal neurologic signs. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)

Fibrous Meningiomas
A relatively common neoplasm of the central nervous system that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and spinal canal. They tend to present in the fourth to sixth decades of life with signs indicative of a slowly progressive mass lesion. Specific clinical manifestations depend on the location of the tumor, but may include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION, cranial neuropathies, ataxia, and other focal neurologic signs. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)

Fibrous tissue
Tissue consisting of or containing fibers.

Fibrous Tissue Neoplasm
Neoplasms composed of fibrous tissue, the ordinary connective tissue of the body, made up largely of yellow or white fibers. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue.

Fibrous Tissue Neoplasms
Neoplasms composed of fibrous tissue, the ordinary connective tissue of the body, made up largely of yellow or white fibers. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue.



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Fibrinolysin
A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.

Fibro-odontoma, Ameloblastic
A mixed tumor of odontogenic origin, in which both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells exhibit complete differentiation, resulting in the formation of tooth structures. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)

Fibrinopeptides B
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the beta chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin. Each peptide chain contains 20 amino acid residues. The removal of fibrinopeptides B is not required for coagulation.

Fibrinopeptides A
Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.

Fibroblast Collagenase
A member of the MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES that cleaves triple-helical collagens types I, II, and III. EC 3.4.24.34.

Fibroadenosis

Fibroadenomas
An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Fibroblast-Derived Neutrophil-Activating Peptides
A cytokine that activates neutrophils and attracts neutrophils and T-lymphocytes. It is released by several cell types including monocytes, macrophages, T-lymphocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes by an inflammatory stimulus. IL-8 is a member of the beta-thromboglobulin superfamily and structurally related to platelet factor 4.

Fibroblast Virus, Human, Permanent
A genus of the family RETROVIRIDAE consisting of viruses with either type B or type D morphology. This includes a few exogenous, vertically transmitted and endogenous viruses of mice (type B) and some primate and sheep viruses (type D). MAMMARY TUMOR VIRUS, MOUSE is the type species.

Fibroblast Intermediate Filament Proteins
Filaments 7-11 nm in diameter found in the cytoplasm of all cells. Many specific proteins belong to this group, e.g., desmin, vimentin, prekeratin, decamin, skeletin, neurofilin, neurofilament protein, and glial fibrillary acid protein.

Fibroepithelial Neoplasm
Neoplasms composed of fibrous and epithelial tissue. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in fibrous tissue or epithelium.

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