Facelift
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  Facelift



Facelift

   A surgical procedure designed to make the face appear younger by pulling loose facial skin taut. With age or excessive sun exposure, wrinkled creased skin can develop on the face, neck or forehead along with fat deposits and folds around the jaws and jowls. While a facelift cannot stop the aging process, it may "turn back the clock" in appearance. Recovery time is usually 1 week, and the results last approximately 10 years. Additional procedures to supplement a facelift -- including necklift, blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery), liposuction, autologous fat injection, removal of buccal (cheek) fat pads, forehead lift, and browlift; chemical or laser peel; and malar (cheek), submalar, or chin implants -- may be necessary to achieve the desired results. Although they are infrequent, risks and complications of facelift surgery include bleeding; hematoma; bruising; infection; neurological dysfunction (loss of muscle function or sensation), which is usually temporary; widened or thickened scars; loss of hair around the incision site; asymmetry (unevenness between two sides); and skin necrosis (loss of skin due to tissue death).

RELATED TERMS
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Face
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.

Skin
Skin is an organ of the integumentary system; which is composed of a layer of tissues that protect underlying muscles and organs. Skin is used for insulation, vitamin D production, sensation, and excretion (through sweat).

Forehead
The part of the face above the eyes.

Facelift
A surgical procedure designed to make the face appear younger by pulling loose facial skin taut. With age or excessive sun exposure, wrinkled creased skin can develop on the face, neck or forehead along with fat deposits and folds around the jaws and jowls. While a facelift cannot stop the aging process, it may "turn back the clock" in appearance. Recovery time is usually 1 week, and the results last approximately 10 years. Additional procedures to supplement a facelift -- including necklift, blepharoplasty (eyelid surgery), liposuction, autologous fat injection, removal of buccal (cheek) fat pads, forehead lift, and browlift; chemical or laser peel; and malar (cheek), submalar, or chin implants -- may be necessary to achieve the desired results. Although they are infrequent, risks and complications of facelift surgery include bleeding; hematoma; bruising; infection; neurological dysfunction (loss of muscle function or sensation), which is usually temporary; widened or thickened scars; loss of hair around the incision site; asymmetry (unevenness between two sides); and skin necrosis (loss of skin due to tissue death).

Aging
The process of becoming older, a process that is genetically determined and environmentally modulated.

Blepharoplasty
Plastic surgery on the eyelid.

Liposuction
Type of cosmetic surgery in which localized areas of fat are removed from beneath the skin using a suction-pump device inserted through a small incision.

Autologous
Coming from the same individual, as opposed to being donated by another individual.

Injection
Medication which is put into the body via a syringe and a needle.

Laser
An acronym of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. A surgical tool that creates intense heat and power when focused at close range, destroying cells by vaporizing them.

Chin
Medically, the mentum. The lower portion of the face below the lower lip including the prominence of the lower jaw and the line of fusion of the two separate halves of the jawbone (mandible). This line of fusion (called the symphysis menti) encloses a triangular area at tip of the chin (termed the mental protuberance). On each side, below the second premolar tooth, is the mental foramen, an opening for the passage of blood vessels and a nerve that supply the chin.

Implants
Dental Implants are titanium inserts that are surgically placed into the jawbone by an oral surgeon or a periodontist, and then allowed to integrate into the bone. This process may take up to six months. The implants then can be restored with a post and an artificial tooth that is either screwed into the implant or cemented onto the implant. Implants are more costly than crowns, dentures or bridges and are appropriate only for patients who demonstrate good oral hygiene. Implants enable the dentist to provide the patient with artificial teeth that look and function much more like natural teeth and are as secure as natural teeth. Implants also may be attached to a denture to allow denture wearers a more secure and functional option. Patients must follow the proper home care instructions and visit the dentist at the recommended intervals or the implants can fail or fracture. There are no strict age limitations as to who can receive implants; in fact, implants have been placed on children, adults and the elderly.

Surgery
Treating diseases or other medical conditions by operating on a patient to remove or repair parts of the body.

Hematoma
Swelling of effused blood beneath tissue surface.

Infection
Anything that invades the body and reproduces. Infections can be bacteria, protozoa, fungi, or viruses. Bacteria and fungi are one celled creatures that cause many infections including strep throat, bladder infections, and some lung infections. Fungi cause “athlete’s foot” and thrush, an infection in the mouth. Protozoa are small organisms with many cells that can cause infections in the guts or in the lungs. Most healthy people do not get protozoal infections, but people with suppressed immune systems can. Viruses are not really organisms; they are tiny particles that can live only inside another cell. They reproduce by taking over a cell and causing that cell to make more virus particles, rather than doing what the cell is supposed to do. Viruses cause most colds and flu cases.

Neurological
The medical science that deals with the nervous system and disorders affecting it.

Dysfunction
Difficult function or abnormal function.

Muscle
Tissue made up of bundles of long, slender cells that contract when stimulated.

Hair
A modification of the epidermis found on almost every surface of the body except the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and the glans penis. It is a filament of KERATIN consisting of a shaft, a root, and a point.

Incision
A cut made with a sharp instrument through the skin or other tissue.

Necrosis
Dead tissue that surrounds healthy tissue in the body.

Tissue
Biological tissue is a group of cells that perform a similar function.The study of tissues is known as histology, or, in connection with disease, histopathology.The classical tools for studying the tissues are the wax block, the tissue stain, and the optical microscope, though developments in electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and frozen sections have all added to the sum of knowledge in the last couple of decades.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Face
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.

Face Bow, Orthodontic
Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.

Face Bows, Orthodontic
Extraoral devices for applying force to the dentition in order to avoid some of the problems in anchorage control met with in intermaxillary traction and to apply force in directions not otherwise possible.

Face Flies
A family of the order DIPTERA with over 700 species. Important species that may be mechanical vectors of disease include Musca domesticus (HOUSEFLIES), Musca autumnalis (face fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Haematobia irritans (horn fly) and Fannia spp.

Face Fly
A family of the order DIPTERA with over 700 species. Important species that may be mechanical vectors of disease include Musca domesticus (HOUSEFLIES), Musca autumnalis (face fly), Stomoxys calcitrans (stable fly), Haematobia irritans (horn fly) and Fannia spp.

Face Lift
Plastic surgery performed, usually by excision of skin, for the elimination of wrinkles from the skin.

Face Lifts
Plastic surgery performed, usually by excision of skin, for the elimination of wrinkles from the skin.

Face Pain
Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.

Face Peeling, Chemical
Application of a cauterant to the skin for the purpose of causing a superficial destruction of the epidermis and upper layers of the dermis. After healing, the treated area has new epithelium.

Facelift surgery risks
Although infrequent, the risks and complications of facelift surgery include: bleeding, hematoma, bruising; infection; neurological dysfunction (loss of muscle function or sensation), which is usually temporary; widened or thickened scar; loss of hair (around the incision site), asymmetry (unevenness between two sides); and skin necrosis (loss of skin from tissue death).

Facelifts
Plastic surgery performed, usually by excision of skin, for the elimination of wrinkles from the skin.

Faces
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.

Facet Joint
The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent vertebra.

Facet Joints
The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent vertebra.



PREVIOUS AND NEXT TERMS
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Foramen Ovale
An opening between the atria of the heart that normally closes shortly after birth. An atrial septal defect may develop if the foramen ovale fails to close properly.

Free Mammary Artery Graft
When the surgeon removes the mammary artery from its origin to use as a bypass graft.

Free Radical
A destructive fragment of oxygen produced as a byproduct when cells use oxygen to burn fat.

F (coefficient of inbreeding)
F is the symbol for the coefficient of inbreeding, a way of gauging how close two people are genetically to one another. The coefficient of inbreeding, F, is the probability that a person with two identical genes received both genes from one ancestor.

F (symbol)
A much used symbol, F stands for fractional concentration; free energy; Fahrenheit; visual field; fluorine; force; filial generation, followed by subscript numerals indicating specified matings such as F1); the amino acid phenylalanine; the coefficient of inbreeding , etc.

Facelift

Facelift surgery risks
Although infrequent, the risks and complications of facelift surgery include: bleeding, hematoma, bruising; infection; neurological dysfunction (loss of muscle function or sensation), which is usually temporary; widened or thickened scar; loss of hair (around the incision site), asymmetry (unevenness between two sides); and skin necrosis (loss of skin from tissue death).

Facial canal introitus
In anatomy, an introitus is an entrance, one that goes into a canal or hollow organ. The introitus of the facial canal is the entrance to the facial canal, a passage in the temporal bone of the skull through which the facial nerve (the 7th cranial nerve) travels.

Facial muscle
One of the 43 muscles in the human face. The facial muscles convey basic human emotions such as anger, sadness, fear, surprise, disgust, contempt and happiness by very clear facial signals.

Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy
A form of muscular dystrophy that typically begins before age 20 with slowly progressive weakness of the muscles of the face, shoulders, and feet. The severity of the disease is quite variable. Although most people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) retain the ability to walk, about 20% require a wheelchair. Life expectancy is not shortened. The diagnosis can be confirmed by a DNA test disclosing the deletion of copies of a repeat motif called D4Z4 on chromosome 4. FSHD is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Offspring of an affected individual have a 50% chance of inheriting the mutant chromosome 4. About 10-30% of cases are due to a new mutation. Prenatal testing is available.

Factor V
A coagulation factor needed for the normal clotting of blood. Also known as proaccelerin.

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