Dermatopolymyositis
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  Dermatopolymyositis



Dermatopolymyositis

   A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

RELATED TERMS
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Chronic
Ongoing or recurring. Chronic medical conditions include diabetes, epilepsy, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Disease
Illness or sickness often characterized by typical patient problems (symptoms) and physical findings (signs). Disruption sequence: The events that occur when a fetus that is developing normally is subjected to a destructive agent such as the rubella (German measles) virus.

Muscle
Tissue made up of bundles of long, slender cells that contract when stimulated.

Skin
Skin is an organ of the integumentary system; which is composed of a layer of tissues that protect underlying muscles and organs. Skin is used for insulation, vitamin D production, sensation, and excretion (through sweat).

Proximal
Located closest to the reference point. See distal.

Rash
A reddish spot or patch of irritated skin. Rashes can be caused byillnesses, allergies, and heat and are usually temporary.

Forehead
The part of the face above the eyes.

Arms
An appendage in anatomy and in clinical trials. See: Arm.

Complement
A series of serum proteins involved in the mediation of immune reactions. The complement cascade is triggered classically by the interaction of antibody with specific antigen.

Intramuscular
Intra (within) muscular (muscle) techniques are ways to put medication into the body, by injecting it into a muscle. This is designed for drugs that need to be absorbed slowly. A classic example is a tetanus shot.

Microangiopathy
See: Angiopathy.

Capillaries
Tiny blood vessels between arteries and veins that distribute oxygen-rich blood to the body.

Ischemia
Decreased flow of oxygenated blood to an organ due to obstruction in an artery.

Necrosis
Dead tissue that surrounds healthy tissue in the body.

Atrophy
A defect or failure of cell nutrition manifested as decrease in size or healthiness of an organ or tissue.

Childhood
1. The time for a boy or girl from birth until he or she is an adult. 2. The more circumscribed period of time from infancy to the onset of puberty.

Systemic
Disease or symptoms that affect many different parts of the body.

Vasculitis
Inflammation throughout the body of the blood vessels.

Dermatomyositis
A connective tissue disorder in which a rash and muscle inflammation are the predominant features.

Association
1. In dysmorphology (the study of birth defects), the nonrandom occurrence in two or more individuals of a pattern of multiple anomalies (birth defects) not known to be a malformation syndrome (such as Down syndrome), a malformation sequence (of events) or what is called a polytopic field defect (in which all of the defects are concentrated in one particular area of the body). An example of an association in dysmorphology is the VACTERL association of birth defects. 2. In genetics, the occurrence together of two or more characteristics more often than would be expected by chance alone. An example of association involves a feature on the surface of white blood cells called HLA (HLA stands for human leukocyte antigen). A particular HLA type, HLA type B-27, is associated with an increased risk for a number of diseases including ankylosing spondylitis. The extent of the association is enormous. Ankylosing spondylitis is 87 times more likely to occur in people with HLA B-27 than in the general population.

Malignant
Cancerous; life-threatening.

Neurology
The branch of medicine that pertains to the nervous system.



SIMILAR TERMS
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Derma
Skin.

Derma-smoothe-fs
Derma-smoothe-fs is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): fluocinolone acetonide.

Dermabet
Dermabet is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): betamethasone valerate.

Dermabrasion
A procedure that removes scars, tattoos or other skin defects with fine sandpaper or a high-speed brush.

Dermacort
Dermacort is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): hydrocortisone.

Dermal
Pertaining to the skin.

Dermal Drug Administration
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.

Dermal Drug Administrations
The application of suitable drug dosage forms to the skin for either local or systemic effects.

Dermal Hypoplasia, Focal
A genetic skin disease characterized by hypoplasia of the dermis, herniations of fat, and hand anomalies. It is found exclusively in females and transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait.

Dermal Hypoplasias, Focal
A genetic skin disease characterized by hypoplasia of the dermis, herniations of fat, and hand anomalies. It is found exclusively in females and transmitted as an X-linked dominant trait.

Dermalon
Polymers where the main polymer chain comprises recurring amide groups. These compounds are generally formed from combinations of diamines, diacids, and amino acids and yield fibers, sheeting, or extruded forms used in textiles, gels, filters, sutures, contact lenses, and other biomaterials.

Dermalons
Polymers where the main polymer chain comprises recurring amide groups. These compounds are generally formed from combinations of diamines, diacids, and amino acids and yield fibers, sheeting, or extruded forms used in textiles, gels, filters, sutures, contact lenses, and other biomaterials.

Dermatan sulfate
An glycosaminoglycan (formerly called a mucopolysaccharide) found mostly in skin but also in blood vessels, the heart valves, tendons, and the lungs. Dermatan sulfate accumulates abnormally in several of the mucopolysaccharidosis disorders.

Dermatan Sulfate
A naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan found mostly in the skin and in connective tissue. It differs from CHONDROITIN SULFATE A (see CHONDROITIN SULFATES) by containing IDURONIC ACID in place of glucuronic acid, its epimer, at carbon atom 5. (from Merck, 12th ed)

Dermatitides
Any inflammation of the skin.

Dermatitides, Actinic
Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.

Dermatitides, Allergic Contact
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.

Dermatitides, Allergic Eczematous
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.

Dermatitides, Atopic
A chronic inflammatory genetically determined disease of the skin marked by increased ability to form reagin (IgE), with increased susceptibility to allergic rhinitis and asthma, and hereditary disposition to a lowered threshold for pruritus. It is manifested by lichenification, excoriation, and crusting, mainly on the flexural surfaces of the elbow and knee. In infants it is known as infantile eczema.

Dermatitides, Chronic Actinic
Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.

Dermatitides, Contact
A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.

Dermatitides, Contagious Pustular
An infectious dermatitis of sheep and goats, affecting primarily the muzzle and lips. It is caused by a poxvirus and may be transmitted to man.

Dermatitides, Eczematous
A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).

Dermatitides, Exfoliative
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitides, Irritant
A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.

Dermatitides, Occupational
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.

Dermatitides, Periocular
A papular eruption of unknown etiology that progresses to residual papular erythema and scaling usually confined to the area of the mouth, and almost exclusively occurring in young women. It may also be localized or extend to involve the eyelids and adjacent glabella area of the forehead (periocular dermatitis). (Dorland, 28th ed)

Dermatitides, Perioral
A papular eruption of unknown etiology that progresses to residual papular erythema and scaling usually confined to the area of the mouth, and almost exclusively occurring in young women. It may also be localized or extend to involve the eyelids and adjacent glabella area of the forehead (periocular dermatitis). (Dorland, 28th ed)

Dermatitides, Photoallergic
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitides, Photosensitive Contact
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitides, Phototoxic
A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitides, Phototoxic Contact
A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitides, Poison Ivy
An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitides, Radiation-Induced
A cutaneous inflammatory reaction occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation.

Dermatitides, Rhus
An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitides, Seborrheic
A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin of unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate erythema, dry, moist, or greasy scaling, and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp. On the scalp, it generally appears first as small patches of scales, progressing to involve the entire scalp with exfoliation of excessive amounts of dry scales (dandruff).

Dermatitides, Toxicodendron
An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitis
Dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a skin irritation characterized by red, flaky skin, sometimes with cracks or tiny blisters. Dermatitis is extremely itchy, but scratching damages the fragile skin and exacerbates the problem so it is important for people with eczema to try to leave the area alone.

Dermatitis and diarrhea, zinc deficiency
Among the consequences of zinc deficiency, dermatitis (skin inflammation) and diarrhea are particularly prominent features.

Dermatitis Exfoliativa
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitis Herpetiformis
Rare, chronic, papulo-vesicular disease characterized by an intensely pruritic eruption consisting of various combinations of symmetrical, erythematous, papular, vesicular, or bullous lesions. The disease is strongly associated with the presence of HLA-B8 and HLA-DR3 antigens. A variety of different autoantibodies has been detected in small numbers in patients with dermatitis herpetiformis.

Dermatitis Medicamentosa
Adverse cutaneous reactions caused by ingestion, parenteral use, or local application of a drug. These may assume various morphologic patterns and produce various types of lesions.

Dermatitis Seborrheica
A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin of unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate erythema, dry, moist, or greasy scaling, and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp. On the scalp, it generally appears first as small patches of scales, progressing to involve the entire scalp with exfoliation of excessive amounts of dry scales (dandruff).

Dermatitis Venenata
A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.

Dermatitis, Actinic
Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.

Dermatitis, Allergic Eczematous
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.

Dermatitis, atopic
A skin disease characterized by areas of severe itching, redness, scaling, and loss of the surface of the skin (excoriation). When the eruption (rash) has been present for a prolonged time, chronic changes occur due to the constant scratching and rubbing known as lichenification (thickening of the skin with accentuation of the skin lines to form a crisscross pattern). This disorder usually affects young children on the face and extensor surfaces of the arms and legs (elbow and knee sides). Older children and adults are usually affected on the sides of the neck and on the inside of the elbow and knee. Atopic dermatitis is frequently associated with other atopic (allergic) disorders, especially asthma and allergic rhinitis (hayfever). A defect of the immune system within the skin has been shown, but the reason for this is unknown.

Dermatitis, Chronic Actinic
Abnormal responses to sunlight or artificial light due to extreme reactivity of light-absorbing molecules in tissues. It refers almost exclusively to skin photosensitivity, including sunburn, reactions due to repeated prolonged exposure in the absence of photosensitizing factors, and reactions requiring photosensitizing factors such as photosensitizing agents and certain diseases. With restricted reference to skin tissue, it does not include photosensitivity of the eye to light, as in photophobia or photosensitive epilepsy.

Dermatitis, Contact
A type of acute or chronic skin reaction in which sensitivity is manifested by reactivity to materials or substances coming in contact with the skin. It may involve allergic or non-allergic mechanisms.

Dermatitis, Contact, Allergic
A contact dermatitis due to allergic sensitization to various substances. These substances subsequently produce inflammatory reactions in the skin of those who have acquired hypersensitivity to them as a result of prior exposure.

Dermatitis, Contact, Photoallergic
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Contact, Photosensitive
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Contact, Phototoxic
A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Contagious Pustular
An infectious dermatitis of sheep and goats, affecting primarily the muzzle and lips. It is caused by a poxvirus and may be transmitted to man.

Dermatitis, Eczematous
A pruritic papulovesicular dermatitis occurring as a reaction to many endogenous and exogenous agents (Dorland, 27th ed).

Dermatitis, Exfoliative
The widespread involvement of the skin by a scaly, erythematous dermatitis occurring either as a secondary or reactive process to an underlying cutaneous disorder (e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, etc.), or as a primary or idiopathic disease. It is often associated with the loss of hair and nails, hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles, and pruritus. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitis, Irritant
A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.

Dermatitis, Occupational
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.

Dermatitis, Periocular
A papular eruption of unknown etiology that progresses to residual papular erythema and scaling usually confined to the area of the mouth, and almost exclusively occurring in young women. It may also be localized or extend to involve the eyelids and adjacent glabella area of the forehead (periocular dermatitis). (Dorland, 28th ed)

Dermatitis, Perioral
A papular eruption of unknown etiology that progresses to residual papular erythema and scaling usually confined to the area of the mouth, and almost exclusively occurring in young women. It may also be localized or extend to involve the eyelids and adjacent glabella area of the forehead (periocular dermatitis). (Dorland, 28th ed)

Dermatitis, Photoallergic
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Photoallergic Contact
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Photocontact
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Photosensitive Contact
A delayed hypersensitivity involving the reaction between sunlight or other radiant energy source and a chemical substance to which the individual has been previously exposed and sensitized. It manifests as a papulovesicular, eczematous, or exudative dermatitis occurring chiefly on the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Phototoxic
A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Phototoxic Contact
A nonimmunologic, chemically induced type of photosensitivity producing a sometimes vesiculating dermatitis. It results in hyperpigmentation and desquamation of the light-exposed areas of the skin.

Dermatitis, Poison Ivy
An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitis, Primary Irritant
A non-allergic contact dermatitis caused by prolonged exposure to irritants and not explained by delayed hypersensitivity mechanisms.

Dermatitis, Radiation Induced
A cutaneous inflammatory reaction occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation.

Dermatitis, Radiation-Induced
A cutaneous inflammatory reaction occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation.

Dermatitis, Rhus
An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatitis, Seborrheic
A chronic inflammatory disease of the skin of unknown etiology. It is characterized by moderate erythema, dry, moist, or greasy scaling, and yellow crusted patches on various areas, especially the scalp. On the scalp, it generally appears first as small patches of scales, progressing to involve the entire scalp with exfoliation of excessive amounts of dry scales (dandruff).

Dermatitis, stasis
A skin irritation on the lower legs, generally related to circulatory problems. Stasis refers to a stoppage or slowdown in the flow of blood (or other body fluid such as lymph). A stasis ulcer is an ulcer (a crater) that develops in an area in which the circulation is sluggish and the venous return (the return of venous blood toward the heart) is poor. A common location for stasis ulcers is on the ankle.

Dermatitis, Toxicodendron
An allergic contact dermatitis caused by exposure to plants of the genus Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus). These include poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac, all plants that contain the substance urushiol, a potent skin sensitizing agent. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatofibroma
A common type of benign skin tumor that is small, slow-growing, typically firm, red-to-brown and most often on the legs. Also called a fibrous histiocytoma. They can grow up to about 1 cm (less than a half inch) in diameter. A dermatofibroma consists of a proliferation of scar-like tissue within the deeper layers of the skin (dermis). The cause of dermatofibromas is unknown. They are usually single but sometimes may be multiple. Simple excision is curative.

Dermatofibromas
A slowly growing benign skin nodule consisting of poorly demarcated cellular fibrous tissue enclosing collapsed capillaries with scattered hemosiderin-pigmented and lipid macrophages. They are common, usually about 1 cm in diameter and occur in the dermis. Simple excision is always curative. (From Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Dermatofibrosarcoma
A fibrosarcoma of the skin, beginning most often as an indurated nodule that grows slowly and hence is often ignored until it grows large. Dermatofibrosarcomas show an extremely aggressive tendency to invade local surrounding tissue. They do not metastasize, however, even after multiple recurrences. About 50% will recur after simple incision; hence wide excision should be resorted to. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans
(DFSP) A type of skin tumor that begins as a hard nodule and grows slowly. DFSP is usually found in the dermis of the limbs or trunk of the body. (The dermis is the inner layer of the two main layers of tissue that make up the skin.) DFSP can grow and invade surrounding tissues but typically it does not metastasize (spread) to other more distant parts of the body. The cytogenetic hallmark of DFSP is an extra ring chromosome containing material from chromosomes 17 and 22, or, less frequently, a translocation between chromosomes 17 and 22. These chromosome rearrangements in DFSP fuse the COL1A1 gene on chromosome 17 to the PDGFB gene on chromosome 22. COL1A1 is type 1 alpha-1 chain of collagen while PDGFB is platelet-derived growth factor receptor B. Gleevec (imatinib), a targeted-gene drug which was developed to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is reportedly effective in slowing the growth of DFSP in most cases. Gleevec acts in this regard by inhibiting the PDGFB receptor.

Dermatofibrosarcomas
A fibrosarcoma of the skin, beginning most often as an indurated nodule that grows slowly and hence is often ignored until it grows large. Dermatofibrosarcomas show an extremely aggressive tendency to invade local surrounding tissue. They do not metastasize, however, even after multiple recurrences. About 50% will recur after simple incision; hence wide excision should be resorted to. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1356)

Dermatoglyphic
Pertaining to dermatoglyphics -- the study of dermal ridges on the fingers, palms, toes, and soles.

Dermatoglyphics
The study of the patterns of ridges on the skin of the fingers, palms, toes, and soles. Dermatoglyphics are of interest in anthropology, criminology, and medicine, including dysmorphology (the study of congenital malformations) and the study of chromosome abnormalities such as trisomy 21 (Down syndrome).

Dermatographism
A common form of hives that follows the repeated stroking, rubbing or scratching of the skin, or when tight-fitting clothes rub the skin. Dermatographism occurs in about 5% of the population.

Dermatologic
Having to do with the skin.

Dermatologic Agent
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.

Dermatologic Agents
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.

Dermatologic surgery
Deals with the diagnosis and treatment of medically necessary and cosmetic conditions of the skin, hair, nails, veins, mucous membranes and adjacent tissues by various surgical, reconstructive, cosmetic and non-surgical methods. This includes laser surgery, cryosurgery, chemical surgery, aspirational surgery and excisional surgery. The purpose of dermatologic surgery is to repair and/or improve the function and cosmetic appearance of skin tissue.

Dermatological Agent
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.

Dermatological Agents
Drugs used to treat or prevent skin disorders or for the routine care of skin.

Dermatologist
A doctor who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of skin problems.

Dermatology
The branch of medicine that is concerned with the physiology and pathology of the skin.

Dermatolyses
A group of connective tissue diseases in which skin hangs in loose pendulous folds. It is believed to be associated with decreased elastic tissue formation as well as an abnormality in elastin formation. Cutis laxa is usually a genetic disease, but acquired cases have been reported. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatolysis
A group of connective tissue diseases in which skin hangs in loose pendulous folds. It is believed to be associated with decreased elastic tissue formation as well as an abnormality in elastin formation. Cutis laxa is usually a genetic disease, but acquired cases have been reported. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatome
1. A localized area of skin that is has its sensation via a single nerve from a single nerve root of the spinal cord. Shingles (herpes zoster) typically affects one or several isolated dermatomes. 2. A dermatome is also a cutting instrument used for skin grafting or slicing thin pieces of skin.

Dermatomegaly
A group of connective tissue diseases in which skin hangs in loose pendulous folds. It is believed to be associated with decreased elastic tissue formation as well as an abnormality in elastin formation. Cutis laxa is usually a genetic disease, but acquired cases have been reported. (From Dorland, 27th ed)

Dermatomyces
A family of ascomycetous fungi, order Onygenales, characterized by smooth ascospores. The two genera in the fmaily are Arthroderma and Ctenomyces. Several well-known anamorphic forms are parasitic upon the skin.

Dermatomycoses
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.

Dermatomycosis
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.

Dermatomyositides
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatomyositides, Adult Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatomyositides, Childhood Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatomyositis
A connective tissue disorder in which a rash and muscle inflammation are the predominant features.

Dermatomyositis, Adult Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatomyositis, Childhood Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermaton
An organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide and an acaricide.

Dermatop
Dermatop is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): prednicarbate.

Dermatop e emollient
Dermatop e emollient is a prescription or over-the-counter drug which is (or once was) approved in the United States and possibly in other countries. Active ingredient(s): prednicarbate.

Dermatopathy
Any disease of the skin. Synonymous with dermopathy.

Dermatophytes
A family of ascomycetous fungi, order Onygenales, characterized by smooth ascospores. The two genera in the fmaily are Arthroderma and Ctenomyces. Several well-known anamorphic forms are parasitic upon the skin.

Dermatophytic onychomycosis
Ringworm of the nail, the most common fungus infection of the nails (onychomycosis). Onychomycosis makes the nails look white and opaque, thickened, and brittle. Older women (perhaps because estrogen deficiency may increase the risk of infection), and men and women with diabetes or disease of the small blood vessels (peripheral vascular disease) are at increased risk. Artificial nails (acrylic or "wraps") increase the risk because when an artificial nail is applied, the nail surface is usually abraded with an emery board damaging it, emery boards can carry infection, and water can collect under the nail creating a moist, warm environment for fungal growth. Alternative names include tinea unguium.

Dermatophytoses
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.

Dermatophytosis
Superficial infections of the skin or its appendages by any of various fungi.

Dermatoplasties
The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.

Dermatoplasty
The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.

Dermatopolymyositides
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatoscleroses
A chronic, localized hardening and thickening of the skin. Lesions may be categorized as morphea (guttate, profunda, pansclerotic) or linear (with or without melorheostosis or hemiatrophy). It is twice as common in women as in men. The condition is characterized by skin ischemia, lymphocytic infiltrates, swollen collagen bundles, and thickening of the dermis with reduction of subcutaneous fat.

Dermatosclerosis
A chronic, localized hardening and thickening of the skin. Lesions may be categorized as morphea (guttate, profunda, pansclerotic) or linear (with or without melorheostosis or hemiatrophy). It is twice as common in women as in men. The condition is characterized by skin ischemia, lymphocytic infiltrates, swollen collagen bundles, and thickening of the dermis with reduction of subcutaneous fat.

Dermatoscopy
A noninvasive diagnostic technique for the early diagnosis of melanoma and the evaluation of other pigmented and non-pigmented lesions on the skin that are not as well seen with the unaided eye. Also known as surface microscopy, dermoscopy, and epiluminescence microscopy.

Dermatoses, Bullous
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)

Dermatoses, Foot
Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.

Dermatoses, Industrial
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.

Dermatoses, Leg
A nonspecific term used to denote any cutaneous lesion or group of lesions, or eruptions of any type on the leg. (From Stedman, 25th ed)

Dermatoses, Subcorneal Pustular
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)

Dermatoses, Vesiculobullous
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)

Dermatosis, Foot
Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.

Dermatosis, Industrial
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.

Dermatosis, Leg
A nonspecific term used to denote any cutaneous lesion or group of lesions, or eruptions of any type on the leg. (From Stedman, 25th ed)

Dermatosis, Subcorneal Pustular
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)

Dermatotoxins
Specific substances elaborated by plants, microorganisms or animals that cause damage to the skin; they may be proteins or other specific factors or substances; constituents of spider, jellyfish or other venoms cause dermonecrosis and certain bacteria synthesize dermolytic agents.

Dermicidin
A potent anti-infective agent that is a natural component of sweat. The first antimicrobial agent found that is produced by cells in the skin, dermicidin is reportedly active against many different types of bacteria (including Escherichia coli (E. coli), Enterococcus faecalis, and Staphylococcus (Staph) aureus) and the common fungus Candida albicans. B102Dermicidin is also the name of the gene that encodes the protein product, dermicidin.

Dermis
A layer of vascular connective tissue underneath the EPIDERMIS. The surface of the dermis contains sensitive papillae. Embedded in or beneath the dermis are SWEAT GLANDS, hair follicles, and SEBACEOUS GLANDS.

Dermodress
A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN, CONNECTIVE TISSUE, and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).

Dermoid
Also called a dermoid cyst of the ovary, this is a bizarre tumor, usually benign, in the ovary that typically contains a diversity of tissues including hair, teeth, bone, thyroid, etc. A dermoid cyst develops from a totipotential germ cell (a primary oocyte) that is retained within the egg sac (ovary). Being totipotential, that cell can give rise to all orders of cells necessary to form mature tissues and often recognizable structures such as hair, bone and sebaceous (oily) material, neural tissue and teeth. Dermoid cysts may occur at any age but the prime age of detection is in the childbearing years. The average age is 30. Up to 15% of women with ovarian teratomas have them in both ovaries. Dermoid cysts can range in size from a centimeter (less than a half inch) up to 45 cm (about 17 inches) in diameter.

Dermoid cyst
A congenital (born with) tumor present in infancy as a yellowish swelling on the surface of the eye. It may enlarge during puberty. The dermoid cyst can be surgically removed by an ophthalmologist.

Dermoid Cyst
A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Dermoid cyst of the ovary
A bizarre tumor, usually benign, in the ovary that typically contains a diversity of tissues including hair, teeth, bone, thyroid, etc. A dermoid cyst develops from a totipotential germ cell (a primary oocyte) that is retained within the egg sac (ovary). Being totipotential, that cell can give rise to all orders of cells necessary to form mature tissues and often recognizable structures such as hair, bone and sebaceous (oily) material, neural tissue and teeth. Dermoid cysts may occur at any age but the prime age of detection is in the childbearing years. The average age is 30. Up to 15% of women with ovarian teratomas have them in both ovaries. Dermoid cysts can range in size from a centimeter (less than a half inch) up to 45 cm (about 17 inches) in diameter. These cysts can cause the ovary to twist (torsion) and imperil its blood supply. The larger the dermoid cyst, the greater the risk of rupture with spillage of the greasy contents which can create problems with adhesions, pain etc. Although the large majority (about 98%) of these tumors are benign, the remaining fraction (about 2%) becomes cancerous (malignant). Removal of the dermoid cyst is usually the treatment of choice. This can be done by laparotomy (open surgery) or laparoscopy (with a scope). Torsion (twisting) of the ovary by the cyst is an emergency and calls for urgent surgery. Dermoid cysts of the ovary are also called simply dermoids or ovarian teratomas.

Dermoid Cysts
A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Dermoids
A tumor consisting of displaced ectodermal structures along the lines of embryonic fusion, the wall being formed of epithelium-lined connective tissue, including skin appendages, and containing keratin, sebum, and hair. (Stedman, 25th ed)

Dermolysins
Protein exotoxins from Staphylococcus aureus, phage type II, which cause epidermal necrolysis. They are proteins with a molecular weight of 26,000 to 32,000. They cause a condition variously called scaled skin, Lyell or Ritter syndrome, epidermal exfoliative disease, toxic epidermal necrolysis, etc.

Dermopathy
Any disease of the skin. Synonymous with dermatopathy.

Dermotoxins
Specific substances elaborated by plants, microorganisms or animals that cause damage to the skin; they may be proteins or other specific factors or substances; constituents of spider, jellyfish or other venoms cause dermonecrosis and certain bacteria synthesize dermolytic agents.

Dermotricine
A polypeptide antibiotic mixture obtained from Bacillus brevis. It consists of a mixture of three tyrocidines (60%) and several gramicidins (20%) and is very toxic to blood, liver, kidneys, meninges, and the olfactory apparatus. It is used topically.



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Dermatophytes
A family of ascomycetous fungi, order Onygenales, characterized by smooth ascospores. The two genera in the fmaily are Arthroderma and Ctenomyces. Several well-known anamorphic forms are parasitic upon the skin.

Dermatoses, Industrial
A recurrent contact dermatitis caused by substances found in the work place.

Dermatoses, Foot
Skin diseases of the foot, general or unspecified.

Dermatoses, Bullous
Skin diseases characterized by local or general distributions of blisters. They are classified according to the site and mode of blister formation. Lesions can appear spontaneously or be precipitated by infection, trauma, or sunlight. Etiologies include immunologic and genetic factors. (From Scientific American Medicine, 1990)

Dermatosclerosis
A chronic, localized hardening and thickening of the skin. Lesions may be categorized as morphea (guttate, profunda, pansclerotic) or linear (with or without melorheostosis or hemiatrophy). It is twice as common in women as in men. The condition is characterized by skin ischemia, lymphocytic infiltrates, swollen collagen bundles, and thickening of the dermis with reduction of subcutaneous fat.

Dermatopolymyositis

Dermatoscleroses
A chronic, localized hardening and thickening of the skin. Lesions may be categorized as morphea (guttate, profunda, pansclerotic) or linear (with or without melorheostosis or hemiatrophy). It is twice as common in women as in men. The condition is characterized by skin ischemia, lymphocytic infiltrates, swollen collagen bundles, and thickening of the dermis with reduction of subcutaneous fat.

Dermaton
An organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor that is used as an insecticide and an acaricide.

Dermatomyositis, Childhood Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatomyositis, Adult Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

Dermatomyositides, Childhood Type
A subacute or chronic inflammatory disease of muscle and skin, marked by proximal muscle weakness and a characteristic skin rash. The illness occurs with approximately equal frequency in children and adults. The skin lesions usually take the form of a purplish rash (or less often an exfoliative dermatitis) involving the nose, cheeks, forehead, upper trunk, and arms. The disease is associated with a complement mediated intramuscular microangiopathy, leading to loss of capillaries, muscle ischemia, muscle-fiber necrosis, and perifascicular atrophy. The childhood form of this disease tends to evolve into a systemic vasculitis. Dermatomyositis may occur in association with malignant neoplasms. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1405-6)

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